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Upper respiratory tract infections in young children: duration of and frequency of complications.
Pediatrics. 1991 Feb; 87(2):129-33.Ped

Abstract

This study was performed to determine the usual duration of community-acquired viral upper respiratory tract infections and the incidence of complications (otitis media/sinusitis) of these respiratory tract infections in infancy and early childhood. Children in various forms of child-care arrangements (home care, group care, and day care) were enrolled at birth and observed for 3 years. Families were telephoned every 2 weeks to record on a standardized form the type and severity of illnesses experienced during the previous interval. Only children remaining in their original child-care group for the entire study period were compared. The mean duration of an upper respiratory tract infection varied between 6.6 days (for 1- to 2-year-old children in home care) and 8.9 days (for children younger than 1 year in day care). The percentage of apparently simple upper respiratory tract infections that lasted more than 15 days ranged from 6.5% (for 1- to 3-year-old children in home care) to 13.1% (for 2- to 3-year-old children in day care). Children in day care were more likely than children in home care to have protracted respiratory symptoms. Of 2741 respiratory tract infections recorded for the 3-year period, 801 (29.2%) were complicated by otitis media. During the first 2 years of life, children in any type of day care were more likely than children in home care to have otitis media as a complication of upper respiratory tract infection. In year 3, the risk of otitis media was similar in all types of child care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1987522

Citation

Wald, E R., et al. "Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Young Children: Duration of and Frequency of Complications." Pediatrics, vol. 87, no. 2, 1991, pp. 129-33.
Wald ER, Guerra N, Byers C. Upper respiratory tract infections in young children: duration of and frequency of complications. Pediatrics. 1991;87(2):129-33.
Wald, E. R., Guerra, N., & Byers, C. (1991). Upper respiratory tract infections in young children: duration of and frequency of complications. Pediatrics, 87(2), 129-33.
Wald ER, Guerra N, Byers C. Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Young Children: Duration of and Frequency of Complications. Pediatrics. 1991;87(2):129-33. PubMed PMID: 1987522.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Upper respiratory tract infections in young children: duration of and frequency of complications. AU - Wald,E R, AU - Guerra,N, AU - Byers,C, PY - 1991/2/1/pubmed PY - 1991/2/1/medline PY - 1991/2/1/entrez SP - 129 EP - 33 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 87 IS - 2 N2 - This study was performed to determine the usual duration of community-acquired viral upper respiratory tract infections and the incidence of complications (otitis media/sinusitis) of these respiratory tract infections in infancy and early childhood. Children in various forms of child-care arrangements (home care, group care, and day care) were enrolled at birth and observed for 3 years. Families were telephoned every 2 weeks to record on a standardized form the type and severity of illnesses experienced during the previous interval. Only children remaining in their original child-care group for the entire study period were compared. The mean duration of an upper respiratory tract infection varied between 6.6 days (for 1- to 2-year-old children in home care) and 8.9 days (for children younger than 1 year in day care). The percentage of apparently simple upper respiratory tract infections that lasted more than 15 days ranged from 6.5% (for 1- to 3-year-old children in home care) to 13.1% (for 2- to 3-year-old children in day care). Children in day care were more likely than children in home care to have protracted respiratory symptoms. Of 2741 respiratory tract infections recorded for the 3-year period, 801 (29.2%) were complicated by otitis media. During the first 2 years of life, children in any type of day care were more likely than children in home care to have otitis media as a complication of upper respiratory tract infection. In year 3, the risk of otitis media was similar in all types of child care. SN - 0031-4005 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1987522/Upper_respiratory_tract_infections_in_young_children:_duration_of_and_frequency_of_complications_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/viralinfections.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -