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Dental arch dimensions and tooth wear in two samples of children in the 1950s and 1990s.
Br Dent J. 2009 Dec 19; 207(12):E24.BD

Abstract

AIM

The objective of this study was to compare the degree of tooth wear in posterior deciduous teeth and the dental arch dimensions in the mixed dentition in two modern samples living in the same geographic area and separated by almost 35 years.

METHODS

Dental casts of a group of subjects born between 1953 and 1959 were compared with subjects born between 1990 and 1998. The evaluation of tooth wear scores and measurements for posterior and anterior arch segments, intermolar and intercanine width, and mesiodistal size of incisors were taken. The available anterior space in both arches and the posterior and anterior transverse dimensions were calculated. Groups were compared using a nonparametric test (Mann-Whitney U-test) for independent samples (P<0.05).

RESULTS

The results show that both boys and girls of the 1990s showed significantly smaller maxillary intermolar width when compared with the 1950s. Posterior transverse interarch discrepancy was significantly minor in girls of the 1990s. The comparison of abrasion showed significant differences between the two groups for all examined teeth which appeared to be more abraded in the 1950s group.

CONCLUSIONS

This association can partially explain the greater risk of developing malocclusions in contemporary children compared with children living 35 years before.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthodontics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19876044

Citation

Camporesi, M, et al. "Dental Arch Dimensions and Tooth Wear in Two Samples of Children in the 1950s and 1990s." British Dental Journal, vol. 207, no. 12, 2009, pp. E24.
Camporesi M, Marinelli A, Baroni G, et al. Dental arch dimensions and tooth wear in two samples of children in the 1950s and 1990s. Br Dent J. 2009;207(12):E24.
Camporesi, M., Marinelli, A., Baroni, G., & Defraia, E. (2009). Dental arch dimensions and tooth wear in two samples of children in the 1950s and 1990s. British Dental Journal, 207(12), E24. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2009.960
Camporesi M, et al. Dental Arch Dimensions and Tooth Wear in Two Samples of Children in the 1950s and 1990s. Br Dent J. 2009 Dec 19;207(12):E24. PubMed PMID: 19876044.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dental arch dimensions and tooth wear in two samples of children in the 1950s and 1990s. AU - Camporesi,M, AU - Marinelli,A, AU - Baroni,G, AU - Defraia,E, Y1 - 2009/10/30/ PY - 2009/03/23/accepted PY - 2009/10/31/entrez PY - 2009/10/31/pubmed PY - 2010/3/24/medline SP - E24 EP - E24 JF - British dental journal JO - Br Dent J VL - 207 IS - 12 N2 - AIM: The objective of this study was to compare the degree of tooth wear in posterior deciduous teeth and the dental arch dimensions in the mixed dentition in two modern samples living in the same geographic area and separated by almost 35 years. METHODS: Dental casts of a group of subjects born between 1953 and 1959 were compared with subjects born between 1990 and 1998. The evaluation of tooth wear scores and measurements for posterior and anterior arch segments, intermolar and intercanine width, and mesiodistal size of incisors were taken. The available anterior space in both arches and the posterior and anterior transverse dimensions were calculated. Groups were compared using a nonparametric test (Mann-Whitney U-test) for independent samples (P<0.05). RESULTS: The results show that both boys and girls of the 1990s showed significantly smaller maxillary intermolar width when compared with the 1950s. Posterior transverse interarch discrepancy was significantly minor in girls of the 1990s. The comparison of abrasion showed significant differences between the two groups for all examined teeth which appeared to be more abraded in the 1950s group. CONCLUSIONS: This association can partially explain the greater risk of developing malocclusions in contemporary children compared with children living 35 years before. SN - 1476-5373 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19876044/Dental_arch_dimensions_and_tooth_wear_in_two_samples_of_children_in_the_1950s_and_1990s_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2009.960 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -