Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Increased amygdala activation to averted versus direct gaze in humans is independent of valence of facial expression.
Neuroimage. 2010 Feb 01; 49(3):2680-6.N

Abstract

A recent study in monkeys showed that averted gaze displayed by conspecifics activates the amygdala regardless of the valence of facial expression (angry, neutral, appeasing). In contrast to this result, previous findings on amygdala activation to gaze information in humans have been mainly interpreted in terms of threat-related processing of facial signals. In the present event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study with humans, we investigated brain responses to angry, happy, and neutral faces with either direct or averted gaze. Averted versus direct gaze induced increased amygdala responses regardless of facial expression. This finding suggests a critical role of the amygdala in gaze processing independently of the valence of facial expression. Furthermore, the effect of gaze on amygdalar responses seems to be preserved across nonhuman and human primates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biological and Clinical Psychology, Friedrich Schiller University, Am Steiger 3 // 1, D-07743 Jena, Germany. straube@biopsy.uni-jena.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19883773

Citation

Straube, Thomas, et al. "Increased Amygdala Activation to Averted Versus Direct Gaze in Humans Is Independent of Valence of Facial Expression." NeuroImage, vol. 49, no. 3, 2010, pp. 2680-6.
Straube T, Langohr B, Schmidt S, et al. Increased amygdala activation to averted versus direct gaze in humans is independent of valence of facial expression. Neuroimage. 2010;49(3):2680-6.
Straube, T., Langohr, B., Schmidt, S., Mentzel, H. J., & Miltner, W. H. (2010). Increased amygdala activation to averted versus direct gaze in humans is independent of valence of facial expression. NeuroImage, 49(3), 2680-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.10.074
Straube T, et al. Increased Amygdala Activation to Averted Versus Direct Gaze in Humans Is Independent of Valence of Facial Expression. Neuroimage. 2010 Feb 1;49(3):2680-6. PubMed PMID: 19883773.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased amygdala activation to averted versus direct gaze in humans is independent of valence of facial expression. AU - Straube,Thomas, AU - Langohr,Bernd, AU - Schmidt,Stephanie, AU - Mentzel,Hans-Joachim, AU - Miltner,Wolfgang H R, Y1 - 2009/10/31/ PY - 2009/07/07/received PY - 2009/10/22/revised PY - 2009/10/26/accepted PY - 2009/11/4/entrez PY - 2009/11/4/pubmed PY - 2010/4/14/medline SP - 2680 EP - 6 JF - NeuroImage JO - Neuroimage VL - 49 IS - 3 N2 - A recent study in monkeys showed that averted gaze displayed by conspecifics activates the amygdala regardless of the valence of facial expression (angry, neutral, appeasing). In contrast to this result, previous findings on amygdala activation to gaze information in humans have been mainly interpreted in terms of threat-related processing of facial signals. In the present event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study with humans, we investigated brain responses to angry, happy, and neutral faces with either direct or averted gaze. Averted versus direct gaze induced increased amygdala responses regardless of facial expression. This finding suggests a critical role of the amygdala in gaze processing independently of the valence of facial expression. Furthermore, the effect of gaze on amygdalar responses seems to be preserved across nonhuman and human primates. SN - 1095-9572 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19883773/Increased_amygdala_activation_to_averted_versus_direct_gaze_in_humans_is_independent_of_valence_of_facial_expression_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1053-8119(09)01145-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -