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Prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome: a community survey in an African population.
Ann Afr Med. 2009 Jul-Sep; 8(3):177-80.AA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been reported to be common in the West. Community surveys are lacking in the African setting. We determined the prevalence of IBS in a rural community setting in Nigeria.

METHOD

Questionnaires were administered to consenting individuals. Subjects satisfying the Rome II criteria for IBS were invited for physical examination at a health center to identify the presence of "alarm factors."

RESULTS

One hundred forty (31.6%) of the 443 evaluated individuals fulfilled the Rome II criteria for IBS, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.37:1 (P= .11). The prevalence of IBS was highest (39.3%) in the third decade, followed by 25% in the fourth decade (P= .009). Ninety-six (67%) IBS individuals had the alternating pattern of diarrhea and constipation, whereas 28 (20%) and 19 (13%) had constipation and diarrhea subtypes, respectively.

CONCLUSION

IBS as diagnosed by the Rome II criteria has a high prevalence in the African rural population, as obtained elsewhere.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria. edinony@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19884695

Citation

Okeke, Edith N., et al. "Prevalence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a Community Survey in an African Population." Annals of African Medicine, vol. 8, no. 3, 2009, pp. 177-80.
Okeke EN, Ladep NG, Adah S, et al. Prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome: a community survey in an African population. Ann Afr Med. 2009;8(3):177-80.
Okeke, E. N., Ladep, N. G., Adah, S., Bupwatda, P. W., Agaba, E. I., & Malu, A. O. (2009). Prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome: a community survey in an African population. Annals of African Medicine, 8(3), 177-80. https://doi.org/10.4103/1596-3519.57241
Okeke EN, et al. Prevalence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a Community Survey in an African Population. Ann Afr Med. 2009 Jul-Sep;8(3):177-80. PubMed PMID: 19884695.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome: a community survey in an African population. AU - Okeke,Edith N, AU - Ladep,Nimzing G, AU - Adah,Steven, AU - Bupwatda,Pokop W, AU - Agaba,Emmanuel I, AU - Malu,Abraham O, PY - 2009/11/4/entrez PY - 2009/11/4/pubmed PY - 2010/5/26/medline SP - 177 EP - 80 JF - Annals of African medicine JO - Ann Afr Med VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been reported to be common in the West. Community surveys are lacking in the African setting. We determined the prevalence of IBS in a rural community setting in Nigeria. METHOD: Questionnaires were administered to consenting individuals. Subjects satisfying the Rome II criteria for IBS were invited for physical examination at a health center to identify the presence of "alarm factors." RESULTS: One hundred forty (31.6%) of the 443 evaluated individuals fulfilled the Rome II criteria for IBS, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.37:1 (P= .11). The prevalence of IBS was highest (39.3%) in the third decade, followed by 25% in the fourth decade (P= .009). Ninety-six (67%) IBS individuals had the alternating pattern of diarrhea and constipation, whereas 28 (20%) and 19 (13%) had constipation and diarrhea subtypes, respectively. CONCLUSION: IBS as diagnosed by the Rome II criteria has a high prevalence in the African rural population, as obtained elsewhere. SN - 0975-5764 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19884695/Prevalence_of_irritable_bowel_syndrome:_a_community_survey_in_an_African_population_ L2 - http://www.annalsafrmed.org/article.asp?issn=1596-3519;year=2009;volume=8;issue=3;spage=177;epage=180;aulast=Okeke DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -