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Iron status biomarkers in iron deficient women consuming oily fish versus red meat diet.
J Physiol Biochem. 2009 Jun; 65(2):165-74.JP

Abstract

Specific recommendations for anemic individuals consist in increasing red meat intake, but the population at large is advised to reduce consumption of red meat and increase that of fish, in order to prevent the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to determine the effects of consuming an oily fish compared to a red meat diet on iron status in women with low iron stores. The study was designed attending the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement guidelines. It was a randomised crossover dietary intervention study of two 8-week periods. Twenty-five young women with low iron stores completed the study. Two diets containing a total of 8 portions of fish, meat and poultry per week were designed differing only in their oily fish or red meat content (5 portions per week). At the beginning and the end of each period blood samples were taken and hemoglobin, hematocrit, serum ferritin, serum iron, serum transferrin, serum transferrin receptor-2 and the Zn-protoporphyrin/free-protoporphyrin ratio were determined. Food intake and body weight were monitored. During the oily fish diet, PUFA intake was significantly higher (p=0.010) and iron intake lower (mean+/-SD, 11.5+/-3.4 mg/day vs. 13.9+/-0.1 mg/day, p=0.008), both diets providing lower mean daily iron intake than recommended for menstruating women. Although there were no significant differences after 16 weeks, serum ferritin moderately decreased and soluble transferrin receptor increased with the oily fish, while changes with the red meat diet were the opposite. In conclusion, an oily fish diet compared to a red meat diet does not decrease iron status after 8 weeks in iron deficient women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Metabolism and Nutrition, Instituto del Frío, Food Science and Technology and Nutrition Institute, Spanish National Research Council, 28040 Madrid. snavas@unav.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19886395

Citation

Navas-Carretero, S, et al. "Iron Status Biomarkers in Iron Deficient Women Consuming Oily Fish Versus Red Meat Diet." Journal of Physiology and Biochemistry, vol. 65, no. 2, 2009, pp. 165-74.
Navas-Carretero S, Pérez-Granados AM, Schoppen S, et al. Iron status biomarkers in iron deficient women consuming oily fish versus red meat diet. J Physiol Biochem. 2009;65(2):165-74.
Navas-Carretero, S., Pérez-Granados, A. M., Schoppen, S., Sarria, B., Carbajal, A., & Vaquero, M. P. (2009). Iron status biomarkers in iron deficient women consuming oily fish versus red meat diet. Journal of Physiology and Biochemistry, 65(2), 165-74.
Navas-Carretero S, et al. Iron Status Biomarkers in Iron Deficient Women Consuming Oily Fish Versus Red Meat Diet. J Physiol Biochem. 2009;65(2):165-74. PubMed PMID: 19886395.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron status biomarkers in iron deficient women consuming oily fish versus red meat diet. AU - Navas-Carretero,S, AU - Pérez-Granados,A M, AU - Schoppen,S, AU - Sarria,B, AU - Carbajal,A, AU - Vaquero,M P, PY - 2009/11/6/entrez PY - 2009/11/6/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - 165 EP - 74 JF - Journal of physiology and biochemistry JO - J Physiol Biochem VL - 65 IS - 2 N2 - Specific recommendations for anemic individuals consist in increasing red meat intake, but the population at large is advised to reduce consumption of red meat and increase that of fish, in order to prevent the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to determine the effects of consuming an oily fish compared to a red meat diet on iron status in women with low iron stores. The study was designed attending the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement guidelines. It was a randomised crossover dietary intervention study of two 8-week periods. Twenty-five young women with low iron stores completed the study. Two diets containing a total of 8 portions of fish, meat and poultry per week were designed differing only in their oily fish or red meat content (5 portions per week). At the beginning and the end of each period blood samples were taken and hemoglobin, hematocrit, serum ferritin, serum iron, serum transferrin, serum transferrin receptor-2 and the Zn-protoporphyrin/free-protoporphyrin ratio were determined. Food intake and body weight were monitored. During the oily fish diet, PUFA intake was significantly higher (p=0.010) and iron intake lower (mean+/-SD, 11.5+/-3.4 mg/day vs. 13.9+/-0.1 mg/day, p=0.008), both diets providing lower mean daily iron intake than recommended for menstruating women. Although there were no significant differences after 16 weeks, serum ferritin moderately decreased and soluble transferrin receptor increased with the oily fish, while changes with the red meat diet were the opposite. In conclusion, an oily fish diet compared to a red meat diet does not decrease iron status after 8 weeks in iron deficient women. SN - 1138-7548 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19886395/Iron_status_biomarkers_in_iron_deficient_women_consuming_oily_fish_versus_red_meat_diet_ L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=19886395 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -