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Long-term effects of rapid weight gain in children, adolescents and young adults with appropriate birth weight for gestational age: the Kiel Obesity Prevention Study.
Acta Paediatr. 2010 Feb; 99(2):256-62.AP

Abstract

AIM

This study investigates the effect of rapid weight gain in term children, adolescents and young adults born appropriate for gestational age.

METHODS

In all, 173 girls and 178 boys aged 6.1-19.9 (12.5 +/- 3.1)years participated. Rapid weight gain (group 1) was defined as a change in weight-SDS (standard deviation score) from birth till two years >0.67, 'no change' as > or =-0.67 and < or =0.67 (group 2) vs 'slow weight gain' as <-0.67 (group 3). BMI-SDS, waist circumference (WC) z-score, fat mass (FM)/fat free mass (FFM; Air-Displacement-Plethysmography), resting energy expenditure (REE; ventilated hood system), cardio-metabolic risk factors, serum leptin and adiponectin were assessed. >90th age-/sex-specific BMI-percentile was defined as overweight. Parental BMI, socio-economic status and lifestyle were assessed as confounders.

RESULTS

A total of 22.8% gained weight rapidly, and 15.7% was overweight. Group 1 compared with group 2 and 3 subjects was taller, heavier and had a higher prevalence of overweight (girls/boys: 26.2%/28.9% vs 11.6%/19.0% vs 2.8%/5.0%; p < 0.01/p < 0.05). Concomitantly, a higher WC, %FM and FFM were observed. Rapid weight gain was positively associated with REE (adjusted for FFM) in boys (r = 0.26; p < 0.01), but not with cardio-metabolic risk factors.

CONCLUSION

Rapid weight gain was related to increases in height, weight, a higher prevalence of overweight and central fat distribution. In addition, rapid weight gain was related to a higher REE in boys, but not to cardio-metabolic risk factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut für Humanernährung und Lebensmittelkunde, Christian-Albrechts Universität Kiel, Kiel, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19886896

Citation

Hitze, B, et al. "Long-term Effects of Rapid Weight Gain in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults With Appropriate Birth Weight for Gestational Age: the Kiel Obesity Prevention Study." Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992), vol. 99, no. 2, 2010, pp. 256-62.
Hitze B, Bosy-Westphal A, Plachta-Danielzik S, et al. Long-term effects of rapid weight gain in children, adolescents and young adults with appropriate birth weight for gestational age: the Kiel Obesity Prevention Study. Acta Paediatr. 2010;99(2):256-62.
Hitze, B., Bosy-Westphal, A., Plachta-Danielzik, S., Bielfeldt, F., Hermanussen, M., & Müller, M. J. (2010). Long-term effects of rapid weight gain in children, adolescents and young adults with appropriate birth weight for gestational age: the Kiel Obesity Prevention Study. Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992), 99(2), 256-62. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01573.x
Hitze B, et al. Long-term Effects of Rapid Weight Gain in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults With Appropriate Birth Weight for Gestational Age: the Kiel Obesity Prevention Study. Acta Paediatr. 2010;99(2):256-62. PubMed PMID: 19886896.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term effects of rapid weight gain in children, adolescents and young adults with appropriate birth weight for gestational age: the Kiel Obesity Prevention Study. AU - Hitze,B, AU - Bosy-Westphal,A, AU - Plachta-Danielzik,S, AU - Bielfeldt,F, AU - Hermanussen,M, AU - Müller,M J, Y1 - 2009/11/02/ PY - 2009/11/6/entrez PY - 2009/11/6/pubmed PY - 2010/4/28/medline SP - 256 EP - 62 JF - Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992) JO - Acta Paediatr VL - 99 IS - 2 N2 - AIM: This study investigates the effect of rapid weight gain in term children, adolescents and young adults born appropriate for gestational age. METHODS: In all, 173 girls and 178 boys aged 6.1-19.9 (12.5 +/- 3.1)years participated. Rapid weight gain (group 1) was defined as a change in weight-SDS (standard deviation score) from birth till two years >0.67, 'no change' as > or =-0.67 and < or =0.67 (group 2) vs 'slow weight gain' as <-0.67 (group 3). BMI-SDS, waist circumference (WC) z-score, fat mass (FM)/fat free mass (FFM; Air-Displacement-Plethysmography), resting energy expenditure (REE; ventilated hood system), cardio-metabolic risk factors, serum leptin and adiponectin were assessed. >90th age-/sex-specific BMI-percentile was defined as overweight. Parental BMI, socio-economic status and lifestyle were assessed as confounders. RESULTS: A total of 22.8% gained weight rapidly, and 15.7% was overweight. Group 1 compared with group 2 and 3 subjects was taller, heavier and had a higher prevalence of overweight (girls/boys: 26.2%/28.9% vs 11.6%/19.0% vs 2.8%/5.0%; p < 0.01/p < 0.05). Concomitantly, a higher WC, %FM and FFM were observed. Rapid weight gain was positively associated with REE (adjusted for FFM) in boys (r = 0.26; p < 0.01), but not with cardio-metabolic risk factors. CONCLUSION: Rapid weight gain was related to increases in height, weight, a higher prevalence of overweight and central fat distribution. In addition, rapid weight gain was related to a higher REE in boys, but not to cardio-metabolic risk factors. SN - 1651-2227 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19886896/Long_term_effects_of_rapid_weight_gain_in_children_adolescents_and_young_adults_with_appropriate_birth_weight_for_gestational_age:_the_Kiel_Obesity_Prevention_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01573.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -