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Dynapenic-obesity and physical function in older adults.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dynapenia (low muscle strength) and obesity are associated with an impaired physical function. It was hypothesized that older individuals with both conditions (dynapenic-obesity) would have a more impaired physical function than individuals with dynapenia or obesity alone.

METHODS

This cross-sectional study included 2,039 men and women aged 55 years and older from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Fat mass was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and leg strength by dynamometer. Based on fat mass and leg strength tertiles, four independent groups were identified: non-dynapenic and non-obese, obese alone, dynapenic alone, and dynapenic-obese. An objective physical function measure was obtained from a 20-foot walking speed test, whereas subjective physical function measures were obtained from five self-reported questions.

RESULTS

Within both sexes, the dynapenic-obese group had a slower walking speed than the non-dynapenic and non-obese and obese-alone groups (p <or= .01) but not the dynapenic-alone group. Similarly, with the exception of the dynapenic-alone group in men, the global subjective score was lower in the dynapenic-obese group than in the non-dynapenic and non-obese and obese-alone groups (p <or= .01). By comparison to the dynapenic-obese group, the adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for walking disability were 0.21 (0.12-0.35) in the non-dynapenic and non-obese, 0.34 (0.20-0.56) in the obese-alone, and 0.54 (0.33-0.89) in the dynapenic-obese groups. The corresponding odds ratios for a disability based on the global subjective score were 0.20 (0.09-0.42), 0.60 (0.30-1.21), and 0.41 (0.19-0.87).

CONCLUSION

Dynapenic-obesity was associated with a poorer physical function than obesity alone and in most cases with dynapenia alone.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. danielle.bouchard@queensu.caNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19887536

Citation

Bouchard, Danielle R., and Ian Janssen. "Dynapenic-obesity and Physical Function in Older Adults." The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, vol. 65, no. 1, 2010, pp. 71-7.
Bouchard DR, Janssen I. Dynapenic-obesity and physical function in older adults. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2010;65(1):71-7.
Bouchard, D. R., & Janssen, I. (2010). Dynapenic-obesity and physical function in older adults. The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 65(1), pp. 71-7. doi:10.1093/gerona/glp159.
Bouchard DR, Janssen I. Dynapenic-obesity and Physical Function in Older Adults. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2010;65(1):71-7. PubMed PMID: 19887536.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dynapenic-obesity and physical function in older adults. AU - Bouchard,Danielle R, AU - Janssen,Ian, Y1 - 2009/11/03/ PY - 2009/11/6/entrez PY - 2009/11/6/pubmed PY - 2010/1/16/medline SP - 71 EP - 7 JF - The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences JO - J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. VL - 65 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dynapenia (low muscle strength) and obesity are associated with an impaired physical function. It was hypothesized that older individuals with both conditions (dynapenic-obesity) would have a more impaired physical function than individuals with dynapenia or obesity alone. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 2,039 men and women aged 55 years and older from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Fat mass was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and leg strength by dynamometer. Based on fat mass and leg strength tertiles, four independent groups were identified: non-dynapenic and non-obese, obese alone, dynapenic alone, and dynapenic-obese. An objective physical function measure was obtained from a 20-foot walking speed test, whereas subjective physical function measures were obtained from five self-reported questions. RESULTS: Within both sexes, the dynapenic-obese group had a slower walking speed than the non-dynapenic and non-obese and obese-alone groups (p <or= .01) but not the dynapenic-alone group. Similarly, with the exception of the dynapenic-alone group in men, the global subjective score was lower in the dynapenic-obese group than in the non-dynapenic and non-obese and obese-alone groups (p <or= .01). By comparison to the dynapenic-obese group, the adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for walking disability were 0.21 (0.12-0.35) in the non-dynapenic and non-obese, 0.34 (0.20-0.56) in the obese-alone, and 0.54 (0.33-0.89) in the dynapenic-obese groups. The corresponding odds ratios for a disability based on the global subjective score were 0.20 (0.09-0.42), 0.60 (0.30-1.21), and 0.41 (0.19-0.87). CONCLUSION: Dynapenic-obesity was associated with a poorer physical function than obesity alone and in most cases with dynapenia alone. SN - 1758-535X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19887536/Dynapenic_obesity_and_physical_function_in_older_adults_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/gerona/glp159 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -