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Consumption of caffeinated coffee and a high carbohydrate meal affects postprandial metabolism of a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test in young, healthy males.
Br J Nutr 2010; 103(6):833-41BJ

Abstract

Caffeine and caffeinated coffee (CC) elicit acute insulin insensitivity when ingested before a carbohydrate load. The effects of CC on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity when co-ingested with a high carbohydrate meal and on postprandial metabolism of a subsequent (second) carbohydrate load have not been studied. In a randomised, crossover design, ten healthy males ingested either CC (5 mg caffeine/kg body weight), decaffeinated coffee (DC) or water (W; equal volume) co-ingested with a high glycaemic index cereal followed 3 h later by a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. After the initial meal, insulin area under the curve (AUC) and insulin sensitivity index did not differ between treatments, although glucose AUC for CC (107 (sem 18) mmol/l x 3 h) and DC (74 (sem 15) mmol/l x 3 h) was greater than W (- 0.2 (sem 29) mmol/l x 3 h, P < 0.05). After the second carbohydrate load, insulin AUC for CC was 49 % and 57 % greater (P < 0.01) than for DC and W, respectively. Despite the greater insulin response, glucose AUC for CC (217 (sem 24) mmol/l x 2 h) was greater than both DC (126 (sem 11) mmol/l x 2 h, P = 0.01) and W (55 (sem 34) mmol/l x 2 h, P < 0.001). Insulin sensitivity index after the second meal was lower after CC (8.2 (sem 0.9)) compared with both DC (12.4 (sem 1.2), P < 0.01) and W (13.4 (sem 1.4), P < 0.001). Co-ingestion of CC with one meal resulted in insulin insensitivity during the postprandial phase of a second meal in the absence of further CC ingestion. Thus, CC may play a role in daily glycaemic management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19889241

Citation

Moisey, Lesley L., et al. "Consumption of Caffeinated Coffee and a High Carbohydrate Meal Affects Postprandial Metabolism of a Subsequent Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Young, Healthy Males." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 103, no. 6, 2010, pp. 833-41.
Moisey LL, Robinson LE, Graham TE. Consumption of caffeinated coffee and a high carbohydrate meal affects postprandial metabolism of a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test in young, healthy males. Br J Nutr. 2010;103(6):833-41.
Moisey, L. L., Robinson, L. E., & Graham, T. E. (2010). Consumption of caffeinated coffee and a high carbohydrate meal affects postprandial metabolism of a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test in young, healthy males. The British Journal of Nutrition, 103(6), pp. 833-41. doi:10.1017/S0007114509992406.
Moisey LL, Robinson LE, Graham TE. Consumption of Caffeinated Coffee and a High Carbohydrate Meal Affects Postprandial Metabolism of a Subsequent Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Young, Healthy Males. Br J Nutr. 2010;103(6):833-41. PubMed PMID: 19889241.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of caffeinated coffee and a high carbohydrate meal affects postprandial metabolism of a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test in young, healthy males. AU - Moisey,Lesley L, AU - Robinson,Lindsay E, AU - Graham,Terry E, Y1 - 2009/11/05/ PY - 2009/11/6/entrez PY - 2009/11/6/pubmed PY - 2010/4/2/medline SP - 833 EP - 41 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 103 IS - 6 N2 - Caffeine and caffeinated coffee (CC) elicit acute insulin insensitivity when ingested before a carbohydrate load. The effects of CC on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity when co-ingested with a high carbohydrate meal and on postprandial metabolism of a subsequent (second) carbohydrate load have not been studied. In a randomised, crossover design, ten healthy males ingested either CC (5 mg caffeine/kg body weight), decaffeinated coffee (DC) or water (W; equal volume) co-ingested with a high glycaemic index cereal followed 3 h later by a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. After the initial meal, insulin area under the curve (AUC) and insulin sensitivity index did not differ between treatments, although glucose AUC for CC (107 (sem 18) mmol/l x 3 h) and DC (74 (sem 15) mmol/l x 3 h) was greater than W (- 0.2 (sem 29) mmol/l x 3 h, P < 0.05). After the second carbohydrate load, insulin AUC for CC was 49 % and 57 % greater (P < 0.01) than for DC and W, respectively. Despite the greater insulin response, glucose AUC for CC (217 (sem 24) mmol/l x 2 h) was greater than both DC (126 (sem 11) mmol/l x 2 h, P = 0.01) and W (55 (sem 34) mmol/l x 2 h, P < 0.001). Insulin sensitivity index after the second meal was lower after CC (8.2 (sem 0.9)) compared with both DC (12.4 (sem 1.2), P < 0.01) and W (13.4 (sem 1.4), P < 0.001). Co-ingestion of CC with one meal resulted in insulin insensitivity during the postprandial phase of a second meal in the absence of further CC ingestion. Thus, CC may play a role in daily glycaemic management. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19889241/Consumption_of_caffeinated_coffee_and_a_high_carbohydrate_meal_affects_postprandial_metabolism_of_a_subsequent_oral_glucose_tolerance_test_in_young_healthy_males_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114509992406/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -