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Illness in long-term travelers visiting GeoSentinel clinics.
Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 Nov; 15(11):1773-82.EI

Abstract

Length of travel appears to be associated with health risks. GeoSentinel Surveillance Network data for 4,039 long-term travelers (trip duration >6 months) seen after travel during June 1, 1996, through December 31, 2008, were compared with data for 24,807 short-term travelers (trip duration <1 month). Long-term travelers traveled more often than short-term travelers for volunteer activities (39.7% vs. 7.0%) and business (25.2% vs. 13.8%). More long-term travelers were men (57.2% vs. 50.1%) and expatriates (54.0% vs. 8.9%); most had pretravel medical advice (70.3% vs. 48.9%). Per 1,000 travelers, long-term travelers more often experienced chronic diarrhea, giardiasis, Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria, irritable bowel syndrome (postinfectious), fatigue >1 month, eosinophilia, cutaneous leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, and Entamoeba histolytica diarrhea. Areas of concern for long-term travelers were vector-borne diseases, contact-transmitted diseases, and psychological problems. Our results can help prioritize screening for and diagnosis of illness in long-term travelers and provide evidence-based pretravel advice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. lchen@hms.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19891865

Citation

Chen, Lin H., et al. "Illness in Long-term Travelers Visiting GeoSentinel Clinics." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 15, no. 11, 2009, pp. 1773-82.
Chen LH, Wilson ME, Davis X, et al. Illness in long-term travelers visiting GeoSentinel clinics. Emerging Infect Dis. 2009;15(11):1773-82.
Chen, L. H., Wilson, M. E., Davis, X., Loutan, L., Schwartz, E., Keystone, J., Hale, D., Lim, P. L., McCarthy, A., Gkrania-Klotsas, E., & Schlagenhauf, P. (2009). Illness in long-term travelers visiting GeoSentinel clinics. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(11), 1773-82. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1511.090945
Chen LH, et al. Illness in Long-term Travelers Visiting GeoSentinel Clinics. Emerging Infect Dis. 2009;15(11):1773-82. PubMed PMID: 19891865.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Illness in long-term travelers visiting GeoSentinel clinics. AU - Chen,Lin H, AU - Wilson,Mary E, AU - Davis,Xiaohong, AU - Loutan,Louis, AU - Schwartz,Eli, AU - Keystone,Jay, AU - Hale,Devon, AU - Lim,Poh Lian, AU - McCarthy,Anne, AU - Gkrania-Klotsas,Effrossyni, AU - Schlagenhauf,Patricia, AU - ,, PY - 2009/11/7/entrez PY - 2009/11/7/pubmed PY - 2010/2/6/medline SP - 1773 EP - 82 JF - Emerging infectious diseases JO - Emerging Infect. Dis. VL - 15 IS - 11 N2 - Length of travel appears to be associated with health risks. GeoSentinel Surveillance Network data for 4,039 long-term travelers (trip duration >6 months) seen after travel during June 1, 1996, through December 31, 2008, were compared with data for 24,807 short-term travelers (trip duration <1 month). Long-term travelers traveled more often than short-term travelers for volunteer activities (39.7% vs. 7.0%) and business (25.2% vs. 13.8%). More long-term travelers were men (57.2% vs. 50.1%) and expatriates (54.0% vs. 8.9%); most had pretravel medical advice (70.3% vs. 48.9%). Per 1,000 travelers, long-term travelers more often experienced chronic diarrhea, giardiasis, Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria, irritable bowel syndrome (postinfectious), fatigue >1 month, eosinophilia, cutaneous leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, and Entamoeba histolytica diarrhea. Areas of concern for long-term travelers were vector-borne diseases, contact-transmitted diseases, and psychological problems. Our results can help prioritize screening for and diagnosis of illness in long-term travelers and provide evidence-based pretravel advice. SN - 1080-6059 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19891865/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1511.090945 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -