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Dose-dependent inhibitory effect of phenolic compounds in foods on nonheme-iron absorption in men.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1991 Feb; 53(2):554-7.AJ

Abstract

Nonheme-iron absorption from a typical Southeast Asian meal was studied to examine the effect of a common vegetable, Yod Kratin, which contains a considerable amount of iron-binding phenolic groups. Yod Kratin (leaves of the lead tree) is a very popular vegetable in Thailand. It is consumed at least once a week year round, sometimes every day, together with the main meal. With a common portion size of the vegetable (20 g), iron absorption was reduced by almost 90%. As little as 5 g inhibited iron absorption by 75%. Addition of ascorbic acid partly counteracted inhibition. Adding 100 mg ascorbic acid reduced inhibition of iron absorption from 5 g Yod Kratin by half and the inhibition from 10 g Yod Kratin by a quarter. The study illustrates the marked effect of iron-binding phenolic compounds on iron nutrition and, thus, the importance of acquiring knowledge of the content of such compounds in different foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Göteborg, Sweden.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1989426

Citation

Tuntawiroon, M, et al. "Dose-dependent Inhibitory Effect of Phenolic Compounds in Foods On Nonheme-iron Absorption in Men." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 53, no. 2, 1991, pp. 554-7.
Tuntawiroon M, Sritongkul N, Brune M, et al. Dose-dependent inhibitory effect of phenolic compounds in foods on nonheme-iron absorption in men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1991;53(2):554-7.
Tuntawiroon, M., Sritongkul, N., Brune, M., Rossander-Hultén, L., Pleehachinda, R., Suwanik, R., & Hallberg, L. (1991). Dose-dependent inhibitory effect of phenolic compounds in foods on nonheme-iron absorption in men. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 53(2), 554-7.
Tuntawiroon M, et al. Dose-dependent Inhibitory Effect of Phenolic Compounds in Foods On Nonheme-iron Absorption in Men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1991;53(2):554-7. PubMed PMID: 1989426.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dose-dependent inhibitory effect of phenolic compounds in foods on nonheme-iron absorption in men. AU - Tuntawiroon,M, AU - Sritongkul,N, AU - Brune,M, AU - Rossander-Hultén,L, AU - Pleehachinda,R, AU - Suwanik,R, AU - Hallberg,L, PY - 1991/2/1/pubmed PY - 1991/2/1/medline PY - 1991/2/1/entrez SP - 554 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 53 IS - 2 N2 - Nonheme-iron absorption from a typical Southeast Asian meal was studied to examine the effect of a common vegetable, Yod Kratin, which contains a considerable amount of iron-binding phenolic groups. Yod Kratin (leaves of the lead tree) is a very popular vegetable in Thailand. It is consumed at least once a week year round, sometimes every day, together with the main meal. With a common portion size of the vegetable (20 g), iron absorption was reduced by almost 90%. As little as 5 g inhibited iron absorption by 75%. Addition of ascorbic acid partly counteracted inhibition. Adding 100 mg ascorbic acid reduced inhibition of iron absorption from 5 g Yod Kratin by half and the inhibition from 10 g Yod Kratin by a quarter. The study illustrates the marked effect of iron-binding phenolic compounds on iron nutrition and, thus, the importance of acquiring knowledge of the content of such compounds in different foods. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1989426/Dose_dependent_inhibitory_effect_of_phenolic_compounds_in_foods_on_nonheme_iron_absorption_in_men_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/53.2.554 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -