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Omega-3 fatty acids in major depressive disorder.
J Clin Psychiatry. 2009; 70 Suppl 5:7-11.JC

Abstract

Patients with major depressive disorder have high rates of cardiovascular disease and other medical comorbidity. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly those found in fish and seafood, have cardiovascular health benefits and may play an adjunctive role in the treatment of mood disorders. However, existing studies on omega-3 fatty acids in depression have limitations such as small sample sizes and a wide variance in study design, and results regarding efficacy are mixed. The preponderance of data from placebo-controlled treatment studies suggests that omega-3 fatty acids are a reasonable augmentation strategy for the treatment of major depressive disorder. More research is necessary before omega-3 supplements can be recommended as monotherapy for the treatment of depression. For many individuals with major depressive disorder, augmentation with omega-3 fatty acids should be considered, as general health benefits are well established and adjunctive use is low risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Women's Mental Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Simches Research Building, 185 Cambridge St, Boston, MA 02114, USA. mfreeman@partners.org

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19909687

Citation

Freeman, Marlene P.. "Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Major Depressive Disorder." The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 70 Suppl 5, 2009, pp. 7-11.
Freeman MP. Omega-3 fatty acids in major depressive disorder. J Clin Psychiatry. 2009;70 Suppl 5:7-11.
Freeman, M. P. (2009). Omega-3 fatty acids in major depressive disorder. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 70 Suppl 5, 7-11. https://doi.org/10.4088/JCP.8157su1c.02
Freeman MP. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Major Depressive Disorder. J Clin Psychiatry. 2009;70 Suppl 5:7-11. PubMed PMID: 19909687.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Omega-3 fatty acids in major depressive disorder. A1 - Freeman,Marlene P, PY - 2009/11/14/entrez PY - 2010/1/14/pubmed PY - 2010/1/21/medline SP - 7 EP - 11 JF - The Journal of clinical psychiatry JO - J Clin Psychiatry VL - 70 Suppl 5 N2 - Patients with major depressive disorder have high rates of cardiovascular disease and other medical comorbidity. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly those found in fish and seafood, have cardiovascular health benefits and may play an adjunctive role in the treatment of mood disorders. However, existing studies on omega-3 fatty acids in depression have limitations such as small sample sizes and a wide variance in study design, and results regarding efficacy are mixed. The preponderance of data from placebo-controlled treatment studies suggests that omega-3 fatty acids are a reasonable augmentation strategy for the treatment of major depressive disorder. More research is necessary before omega-3 supplements can be recommended as monotherapy for the treatment of depression. For many individuals with major depressive disorder, augmentation with omega-3 fatty acids should be considered, as general health benefits are well established and adjunctive use is low risk. SN - 1555-2101 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19909687/Omega_3_fatty_acids_in_major_depressive_disorder_ L2 - http://www.psychiatrist.com/jcp/article/pages/2009/v70s05/v70s0502.aspx DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -