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Health and economic burden of metabolic comorbidity among individuals with bipolar disorder.
J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2009 Dec; 29(6):595-600.JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To compare the prevalence and health care costs of metabolic conditions in patients with bipolar disorder to age- and sex-matched control patients using a large insurance claims database.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of medical service and prescription claims from the Thomson Reuters (Healthcare) MarketScan Commercial Database (which includes claims information on >12 million employees with employer-based insurance and their dependents in the United States) was conducted. Claims data for 28,531 patients with bipolar disorder were compared for 1 year with data for 85,593 age- and sex-matched control patients with no mental health disorders and no psychotropic medication use.

RESULTS

Patients with bipolar disorder had a significantly higher prevalence of metabolic comorbidities than the general population (37% vs 30%, P < 0.0001), and annual medical service treatment costs for metabolic conditions were twice that of the control cohort (531 dollars vs 233 dollars, P < 0.0001). The bipolar cohort had significantly higher overall medical service and prescription drug costs than those of the control cohort (12,764 dollars vs 3,140 dollars, P < 0.0001). Prescription medication costs for metabolic conditions were higher as well, with bipolar cohort per-patient costs of 571 dollars versus 301 dollars for the control cohort (P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with bipolar disorder have significantly more metabolic comorbidities and higher medical costs than age- and sex-matched controls. Studies that link claims data with medical records or primary data collection pertaining to metabolic conditions may overcome limitations in the diagnostic information and outcome predictors. To reduce the medical and economic burden of bipolar disorder, strategies should be identified to prevent the development of metabolic comorbidities and improve medication adherence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Schizophrenia/Bipolar Disorder and Psychopharmacology Programs, McLean Division of Massachusetts General Hospital, Belmont, MA 02478, USA. fcentorrino@mclean.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19910727

Citation

Centorrino, Franca, et al. "Health and Economic Burden of Metabolic Comorbidity Among Individuals With Bipolar Disorder." Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, vol. 29, no. 6, 2009, pp. 595-600.
Centorrino F, Mark TL, Talamo A, et al. Health and economic burden of metabolic comorbidity among individuals with bipolar disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2009;29(6):595-600.
Centorrino, F., Mark, T. L., Talamo, A., Oh, K., & Chang, J. (2009). Health and economic burden of metabolic comorbidity among individuals with bipolar disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 29(6), 595-600. https://doi.org/10.1097/JCP.0b013e3181bef8a6
Centorrino F, et al. Health and Economic Burden of Metabolic Comorbidity Among Individuals With Bipolar Disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2009;29(6):595-600. PubMed PMID: 19910727.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health and economic burden of metabolic comorbidity among individuals with bipolar disorder. AU - Centorrino,Franca, AU - Mark,Tami L, AU - Talamo,Alessandra, AU - Oh,Kelly, AU - Chang,Jane, PY - 2009/11/14/entrez PY - 2009/11/17/pubmed PY - 2010/7/21/medline SP - 595 EP - 600 JF - Journal of clinical psychopharmacology JO - J Clin Psychopharmacol VL - 29 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To compare the prevalence and health care costs of metabolic conditions in patients with bipolar disorder to age- and sex-matched control patients using a large insurance claims database. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of medical service and prescription claims from the Thomson Reuters (Healthcare) MarketScan Commercial Database (which includes claims information on >12 million employees with employer-based insurance and their dependents in the United States) was conducted. Claims data for 28,531 patients with bipolar disorder were compared for 1 year with data for 85,593 age- and sex-matched control patients with no mental health disorders and no psychotropic medication use. RESULTS: Patients with bipolar disorder had a significantly higher prevalence of metabolic comorbidities than the general population (37% vs 30%, P < 0.0001), and annual medical service treatment costs for metabolic conditions were twice that of the control cohort (531 dollars vs 233 dollars, P < 0.0001). The bipolar cohort had significantly higher overall medical service and prescription drug costs than those of the control cohort (12,764 dollars vs 3,140 dollars, P < 0.0001). Prescription medication costs for metabolic conditions were higher as well, with bipolar cohort per-patient costs of 571 dollars versus 301 dollars for the control cohort (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with bipolar disorder have significantly more metabolic comorbidities and higher medical costs than age- and sex-matched controls. Studies that link claims data with medical records or primary data collection pertaining to metabolic conditions may overcome limitations in the diagnostic information and outcome predictors. To reduce the medical and economic burden of bipolar disorder, strategies should be identified to prevent the development of metabolic comorbidities and improve medication adherence. SN - 1533-712X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19910727/Health_and_economic_burden_of_metabolic_comorbidity_among_individuals_with_bipolar_disorder_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/JCP.0b013e3181bef8a6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -