Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Estimation of prepractice hydration status of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes.
J Athl Train 2009 Nov-Dec; 44(6):624-9JA

Abstract

CONTEXT

To our knowledge, no one has compared the prepractice hydration status of male and female National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I athletes or has studied the effects of the menstrual cycle phase on women's prepractice hydration status.

OBJECTIVE

To report prepractice hydration status of collegiate athletes and determine the factors that might influence that status.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional, descriptive study.

SETTING

University sports team practices.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS

Participants included 138 male and 125 female athletes (age = 19.9 + or - 1.3 years, height = 165.8 + or - 42.9 cm, mass = 77.4 + or - 17.5 kg) from an NCAA Division I New England university.

INTERVENTION(S)

One spontaneously voided (spot) urine sample was collected from each participant before his or her team practice and was measured 2 times.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S)

A refractometer was used to analyze the amount of light that passed through a small drop of urine and assess urine specific gravity. Fluid intake and menstrual history for women were also collected. Three hydration-status groups were defined based on the American College of Sports Medicine and National Athletic Trainers' Association criteria: (1) euhydrated, which was urine specific gravity less than 1.020; (2) hypohydrated, from 1.020 to 1.029; and (3) significantly hypohydrated, equal to or more than 1.030.

RESULTS

Thirteen percent of student-athletes appeared significantly hypohydrated, with a mean urine specific gravity of 1.031 + or - 0.002 (chi(2) = 12.12, P < .05); 53% appeared hypohydrated, with a mean urine specific gravity of 1.024 + or - 0.003 (chi(2) = 12.12, P < .05); and 34% appeared euhydrated, with a mean urine specific gravity of 1.012 + or - 0.005 (chi(2) = 0.03, P > .05). A greater percentage of men (47%) than women (28%) were hypohydrated (chi(2) = 8.33, P < .05). In women, no difference was evident between the luteal and follicular phases of their menstrual cycles (chi(2) = 0.02, P > .05).

CONCLUSIONS

Before activity, athletes were hypohydrated at different levels. A greater percentage of men than women were hypohydrated. Menstrual cycle phase did not appear to affect hydration in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Pennsylvania, Division of Biobehavioral and Health Sciences, School of Nursing, Claire M. Fagin Hall, 418 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104-4217, USA. svolpe@nursing.upenn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19911089

Citation

Volpe, Stella L., et al. "Estimation of Prepractice Hydration Status of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Athletes." Journal of Athletic Training, vol. 44, no. 6, 2009, pp. 624-9.
Volpe SL, Poule KA, Bland EG. Estimation of prepractice hydration status of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes. J Athl Train. 2009;44(6):624-9.
Volpe, S. L., Poule, K. A., & Bland, E. G. (2009). Estimation of prepractice hydration status of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes. Journal of Athletic Training, 44(6), pp. 624-9. doi:10.4085/1062-6050-44.6.624.
Volpe SL, Poule KA, Bland EG. Estimation of Prepractice Hydration Status of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Athletes. J Athl Train. 2009;44(6):624-9. PubMed PMID: 19911089.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Estimation of prepractice hydration status of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes. AU - Volpe,Stella L, AU - Poule,Kristen A, AU - Bland,Erica G, PY - 2009/11/14/entrez PY - 2009/11/17/pubmed PY - 2010/4/7/medline KW - dehydration KW - hypohydration KW - refractometer KW - sex KW - sports KW - urine specific gravity SP - 624 EP - 9 JF - Journal of athletic training JO - J Athl Train VL - 44 IS - 6 N2 - CONTEXT: To our knowledge, no one has compared the prepractice hydration status of male and female National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I athletes or has studied the effects of the menstrual cycle phase on women's prepractice hydration status. OBJECTIVE: To report prepractice hydration status of collegiate athletes and determine the factors that might influence that status. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, descriptive study. SETTING: University sports team practices. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Participants included 138 male and 125 female athletes (age = 19.9 + or - 1.3 years, height = 165.8 + or - 42.9 cm, mass = 77.4 + or - 17.5 kg) from an NCAA Division I New England university. INTERVENTION(S): One spontaneously voided (spot) urine sample was collected from each participant before his or her team practice and was measured 2 times. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): A refractometer was used to analyze the amount of light that passed through a small drop of urine and assess urine specific gravity. Fluid intake and menstrual history for women were also collected. Three hydration-status groups were defined based on the American College of Sports Medicine and National Athletic Trainers' Association criteria: (1) euhydrated, which was urine specific gravity less than 1.020; (2) hypohydrated, from 1.020 to 1.029; and (3) significantly hypohydrated, equal to or more than 1.030. RESULTS: Thirteen percent of student-athletes appeared significantly hypohydrated, with a mean urine specific gravity of 1.031 + or - 0.002 (chi(2) = 12.12, P < .05); 53% appeared hypohydrated, with a mean urine specific gravity of 1.024 + or - 0.003 (chi(2) = 12.12, P < .05); and 34% appeared euhydrated, with a mean urine specific gravity of 1.012 + or - 0.005 (chi(2) = 0.03, P > .05). A greater percentage of men (47%) than women (28%) were hypohydrated (chi(2) = 8.33, P < .05). In women, no difference was evident between the luteal and follicular phases of their menstrual cycles (chi(2) = 0.02, P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: Before activity, athletes were hypohydrated at different levels. A greater percentage of men than women were hypohydrated. Menstrual cycle phase did not appear to affect hydration in women. SN - 1938-162X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19911089/Estimation_of_prepractice_hydration_status_of_National_Collegiate_Athletic_Association_Division_I_athletes_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/19911089/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -