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Asthma, allergy, and IgE levels in NYC head start children.
Respir Med. 2010 Mar; 104(3):345-55.RM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Among preschool-age children in New York City neighborhoods with high asthma hospitalization rates, we analyzed the associations of total immunoglobulin E (IgE), specific IgE to common indoor allergens, and allergy symptoms with asthma.

METHODS

Parents of children in New York City Head Start programs were asked to complete a questionnaire covering demographic factors, health history (including respiratory conditions), lifestyle, and home environment. Children's serum samples were analyzed for total IgE and specific IgE antibodies to cockroach, dust mite, mouse, and cat allergens by immunoassay. Logistic regression was used to model the association between asthma and IgE, controlling for age, gender, ethnicity/national origin, BMI, parental asthma, smokers in the household, and allergy symptoms (e.g., runny nose, rash).

RESULTS

Among 453 participating children (mean age 4.0+/-0.5 years), 150 (33%) met our criteria for asthma. In our multivariable logistic regression models, children with asthma were more likely than other children to be sensitized to each allergen, to be sensitized to any of the four allergens (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.0-2.6), or to be in the highest quartile of total IgE (OR=3.1, 95% CI 1.5-6.4). Allergy symptoms based on questionnaire responses were independently associated with asthma (OR=3.7, 95% CI 2.3-5.9).

CONCLUSIONS

Among preschool-aged urban children, asthma was associated with total IgE and sensitization to cat, mouse, cockroach, and dust mite allergens. However, allergy symptoms were more prevalent and more strongly associated with asthma than was any allergen-specific IgE; such symptoms may precede elevated specific IgE or represent a different pathway to asthma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, NY 10032, New York, United States.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19913396

Citation

Rotsides, Demetra Z., et al. "Asthma, Allergy, and IgE Levels in NYC Head Start Children." Respiratory Medicine, vol. 104, no. 3, 2010, pp. 345-55.
Rotsides DZ, Goldstein IF, Canfield SM, et al. Asthma, allergy, and IgE levels in NYC head start children. Respir Med. 2010;104(3):345-55.
Rotsides, D. Z., Goldstein, I. F., Canfield, S. M., Perzanowski, M., Mellins, R. B., Hoepner, L., Ashby-Thompson, M., & Jacobson, J. S. (2010). Asthma, allergy, and IgE levels in NYC head start children. Respiratory Medicine, 104(3), 345-55. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2009.10.016
Rotsides DZ, et al. Asthma, Allergy, and IgE Levels in NYC Head Start Children. Respir Med. 2010;104(3):345-55. PubMed PMID: 19913396.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Asthma, allergy, and IgE levels in NYC head start children. AU - Rotsides,Demetra Z, AU - Goldstein,Inge F, AU - Canfield,Stephen M, AU - Perzanowski,Matthew, AU - Mellins,Robert B, AU - Hoepner,Lori, AU - Ashby-Thompson,Maxine, AU - Jacobson,Judith S, Y1 - 2009/11/13/ PY - 2009/07/06/received PY - 2009/10/16/revised PY - 2009/10/20/accepted PY - 2009/11/17/entrez PY - 2009/11/17/pubmed PY - 2010/9/18/medline SP - 345 EP - 55 JF - Respiratory medicine JO - Respir Med VL - 104 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Among preschool-age children in New York City neighborhoods with high asthma hospitalization rates, we analyzed the associations of total immunoglobulin E (IgE), specific IgE to common indoor allergens, and allergy symptoms with asthma. METHODS: Parents of children in New York City Head Start programs were asked to complete a questionnaire covering demographic factors, health history (including respiratory conditions), lifestyle, and home environment. Children's serum samples were analyzed for total IgE and specific IgE antibodies to cockroach, dust mite, mouse, and cat allergens by immunoassay. Logistic regression was used to model the association between asthma and IgE, controlling for age, gender, ethnicity/national origin, BMI, parental asthma, smokers in the household, and allergy symptoms (e.g., runny nose, rash). RESULTS: Among 453 participating children (mean age 4.0+/-0.5 years), 150 (33%) met our criteria for asthma. In our multivariable logistic regression models, children with asthma were more likely than other children to be sensitized to each allergen, to be sensitized to any of the four allergens (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.0-2.6), or to be in the highest quartile of total IgE (OR=3.1, 95% CI 1.5-6.4). Allergy symptoms based on questionnaire responses were independently associated with asthma (OR=3.7, 95% CI 2.3-5.9). CONCLUSIONS: Among preschool-aged urban children, asthma was associated with total IgE and sensitization to cat, mouse, cockroach, and dust mite allergens. However, allergy symptoms were more prevalent and more strongly associated with asthma than was any allergen-specific IgE; such symptoms may precede elevated specific IgE or represent a different pathway to asthma. SN - 1532-3064 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19913396/Asthma_allergy_and_IgE_levels_in_NYC_head_start_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0954-6111(09)00349-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -