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Opposite effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on human brain function and psychopathology.
Neuropsychopharmacology 2010; 35(3):764-74N

Abstract

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD), the two main ingredients of the Cannabis sativa plant have distinct symptomatic and behavioral effects. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in healthy volunteers to examine whether Delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on regional brain function. We then assessed whether pretreatment with CBD can prevent the acute psychotic symptoms induced by Delta-9-THC. Fifteen healthy men with minimal earlier exposure to cannabis were scanned while performing a verbal memory task, a response inhibition task, a sensory processing task, and when viewing fearful faces. Subjects were scanned on three occasions, each preceded by oral administration of Delta-9-THC, CBD, or placebo. BOLD responses were measured using fMRI. In a second experiment, six healthy volunteers were administered Delta-9-THC intravenously on two occasions, after placebo or CBD pretreatment to examine whether CBD could block the psychotic symptoms induced by Delta-9-THC. Delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on activation relative to placebo in the striatum during verbal recall, in the hippocampus during the response inhibition task, in the amygdala when subjects viewed fearful faces, in the superior temporal cortex when subjects listened to speech, and in the occipital cortex during visual processing. In the second experiment, pretreatment with CBD prevented the acute induction of psychotic symptoms by Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Delta-9-THC and CBD can have opposite effects on regional brain function, which may underlie their different symptomatic and behavioral effects, and CBD's ability to block the psychotogenic effects of Delta-9-THC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Neuroimaging, Division of Psychological Medicine & Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK. s.bhattacharyya@iop.kcl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19924114

Citation

Bhattacharyya, Sagnik, et al. "Opposite Effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol On Human Brain Function and Psychopathology." Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 35, no. 3, 2010, pp. 764-74.
Bhattacharyya S, Morrison PD, Fusar-Poli P, et al. Opposite effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on human brain function and psychopathology. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2010;35(3):764-74.
Bhattacharyya, S., Morrison, P. D., Fusar-Poli, P., Martin-Santos, R., Borgwardt, S., Winton-Brown, T., ... McGuire, P. K. (2010). Opposite effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on human brain function and psychopathology. Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 35(3), pp. 764-74. doi:10.1038/npp.2009.184.
Bhattacharyya S, et al. Opposite Effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol On Human Brain Function and Psychopathology. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2010;35(3):764-74. PubMed PMID: 19924114.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Opposite effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol on human brain function and psychopathology. AU - Bhattacharyya,Sagnik, AU - Morrison,Paul D, AU - Fusar-Poli,Paolo, AU - Martin-Santos,Rocio, AU - Borgwardt,Stefan, AU - Winton-Brown,Toby, AU - Nosarti,Chiara, AU - O' Carroll,Colin M, AU - Seal,Marc, AU - Allen,Paul, AU - Mehta,Mitul A, AU - Stone,James M, AU - Tunstall,Nigel, AU - Giampietro,Vincent, AU - Kapur,Shitij, AU - Murray,Robin M, AU - Zuardi,Antonio W, AU - Crippa,José A, AU - Atakan,Zerrin, AU - McGuire,Philip K, Y1 - 2009/11/18/ PY - 2009/11/20/entrez PY - 2009/11/20/pubmed PY - 2010/9/8/medline SP - 764 EP - 74 JF - Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology JO - Neuropsychopharmacology VL - 35 IS - 3 N2 - Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD), the two main ingredients of the Cannabis sativa plant have distinct symptomatic and behavioral effects. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in healthy volunteers to examine whether Delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on regional brain function. We then assessed whether pretreatment with CBD can prevent the acute psychotic symptoms induced by Delta-9-THC. Fifteen healthy men with minimal earlier exposure to cannabis were scanned while performing a verbal memory task, a response inhibition task, a sensory processing task, and when viewing fearful faces. Subjects were scanned on three occasions, each preceded by oral administration of Delta-9-THC, CBD, or placebo. BOLD responses were measured using fMRI. In a second experiment, six healthy volunteers were administered Delta-9-THC intravenously on two occasions, after placebo or CBD pretreatment to examine whether CBD could block the psychotic symptoms induced by Delta-9-THC. Delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on activation relative to placebo in the striatum during verbal recall, in the hippocampus during the response inhibition task, in the amygdala when subjects viewed fearful faces, in the superior temporal cortex when subjects listened to speech, and in the occipital cortex during visual processing. In the second experiment, pretreatment with CBD prevented the acute induction of psychotic symptoms by Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Delta-9-THC and CBD can have opposite effects on regional brain function, which may underlie their different symptomatic and behavioral effects, and CBD's ability to block the psychotogenic effects of Delta-9-THC. SN - 1740-634X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19924114/Opposite_effects_of_delta_9_tetrahydrocannabinol_and_cannabidiol_on_human_brain_function_and_psychopathology_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2009.184 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -