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Long-term effects of home rehabilitation after hip fracture - 1-year follow-up of functioning, balance confidence, and health-related quality of life in elderly people.
Disabil Rehabil. 2010; 32(1):18-32.DR

Abstract

PURPOSE

To investigate the long-term effects of home rehabilitation (HR) after hip fracture in elderly people.

METHOD

A randomized, controlled longitudinal study on geriatric hospital-based HR was compared with conventional care (CC) in 102 patients. Independence in activities of daily living (ADL), frequency of activity, basic physical performance, balance confidence, health-related quality of life, mood and perceived recovery were measured 6 and 12 months after discharge.

RESULTS

One year post-discharge the HR participants reported significantly higher degree of independence in self-care and locomotion, as well as of balance confidence in stairs and instrumental activities and perceived physical function, than the CC group. One year after discharge 14 persons (29%) in the HR group and five persons (9%) in the CC group considered themselves fully recovered.

CONCLUSIONS

The positive long-term effects were more pronounced among the participants in the HR group than among those who received CC, possibly due to the early start of the HR programme in hospital and its focus on self-efficacy and training of daily activities. However, one year after discharge a mojority of participants in both groups did not consider themselves to be fully recovered when they compared to their situation before the fracture.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden. lena.ziden@gu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19925273

Citation

Zidén, Lena, et al. "Long-term Effects of Home Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture - 1-year Follow-up of Functioning, Balance Confidence, and Health-related Quality of Life in Elderly People." Disability and Rehabilitation, vol. 32, no. 1, 2010, pp. 18-32.
Zidén L, Kreuter M, Frändin K. Long-term effects of home rehabilitation after hip fracture - 1-year follow-up of functioning, balance confidence, and health-related quality of life in elderly people. Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(1):18-32.
Zidén, L., Kreuter, M., & Frändin, K. (2010). Long-term effects of home rehabilitation after hip fracture - 1-year follow-up of functioning, balance confidence, and health-related quality of life in elderly people. Disability and Rehabilitation, 32(1), 18-32. https://doi.org/10.3109/09638280902980910
Zidén L, Kreuter M, Frändin K. Long-term Effects of Home Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture - 1-year Follow-up of Functioning, Balance Confidence, and Health-related Quality of Life in Elderly People. Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(1):18-32. PubMed PMID: 19925273.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term effects of home rehabilitation after hip fracture - 1-year follow-up of functioning, balance confidence, and health-related quality of life in elderly people. AU - Zidén,Lena, AU - Kreuter,Margareta, AU - Frändin,Kerstin, PY - 2009/11/21/entrez PY - 2009/11/21/pubmed PY - 2010/5/5/medline SP - 18 EP - 32 JF - Disability and rehabilitation JO - Disabil Rehabil VL - 32 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate the long-term effects of home rehabilitation (HR) after hip fracture in elderly people. METHOD: A randomized, controlled longitudinal study on geriatric hospital-based HR was compared with conventional care (CC) in 102 patients. Independence in activities of daily living (ADL), frequency of activity, basic physical performance, balance confidence, health-related quality of life, mood and perceived recovery were measured 6 and 12 months after discharge. RESULTS: One year post-discharge the HR participants reported significantly higher degree of independence in self-care and locomotion, as well as of balance confidence in stairs and instrumental activities and perceived physical function, than the CC group. One year after discharge 14 persons (29%) in the HR group and five persons (9%) in the CC group considered themselves fully recovered. CONCLUSIONS: The positive long-term effects were more pronounced among the participants in the HR group than among those who received CC, possibly due to the early start of the HR programme in hospital and its focus on self-efficacy and training of daily activities. However, one year after discharge a mojority of participants in both groups did not consider themselves to be fully recovered when they compared to their situation before the fracture. SN - 0963-8288 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19925273/Long_term_effects_of_home_rehabilitation_after_hip_fracture___1_year_follow_up_of_functioning_balance_confidence_and_health_related_quality_of_life_in_elderly_people_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09638280902980910 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -