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Early life predictors of the physiological stress response later in life.
Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2010 Sep; 35(1):23-32.NB

Abstract

People born at a low birth weight are at increased risk of chronic adult disease including coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, cognitive decline and depression. Recent human and animal research has suggested programming of physiological stress response as an important linking mechanism. We review evidence from human studies, focusing on biological markers as early life indicators and laboratory-induced stress response as an outcome. Several studies show that indicators such as birth weight or length of gestation are associated with alterations in blood pressure, autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) response. In most studies these associations vary according to sex: low birth weight seems to be associated with higher autonomic nervous system response more clearly in females and with higher peripheral vascular resistance and HPAA response in males. The published studies have established the validity of the concept of early life programming of stress response. We believe that important future directions include focusing on specific early life exposures as predictors and on stress response in everyday life as an outcome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. eero.kajantie@helsinki.fiNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19931557

Citation

Kajantie, Eero, and Katri Räikkönen. "Early Life Predictors of the Physiological Stress Response Later in Life." Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, vol. 35, no. 1, 2010, pp. 23-32.
Kajantie E, Räikkönen K. Early life predictors of the physiological stress response later in life. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2010;35(1):23-32.
Kajantie, E., & Räikkönen, K. (2010). Early life predictors of the physiological stress response later in life. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 35(1), 23-32. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2009.11.013
Kajantie E, Räikkönen K. Early Life Predictors of the Physiological Stress Response Later in Life. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2010;35(1):23-32. PubMed PMID: 19931557.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early life predictors of the physiological stress response later in life. AU - Kajantie,Eero, AU - Räikkönen,Katri, Y1 - 2009/11/30/ PY - 2009/07/15/received PY - 2009/10/26/revised PY - 2009/11/14/accepted PY - 2009/11/26/entrez PY - 2009/11/26/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 23 EP - 32 JF - Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews JO - Neurosci Biobehav Rev VL - 35 IS - 1 N2 - People born at a low birth weight are at increased risk of chronic adult disease including coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, cognitive decline and depression. Recent human and animal research has suggested programming of physiological stress response as an important linking mechanism. We review evidence from human studies, focusing on biological markers as early life indicators and laboratory-induced stress response as an outcome. Several studies show that indicators such as birth weight or length of gestation are associated with alterations in blood pressure, autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) response. In most studies these associations vary according to sex: low birth weight seems to be associated with higher autonomic nervous system response more clearly in females and with higher peripheral vascular resistance and HPAA response in males. The published studies have established the validity of the concept of early life programming of stress response. We believe that important future directions include focusing on specific early life exposures as predictors and on stress response in everyday life as an outcome. SN - 1873-7528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19931557/Early_life_predictors_of_the_physiological_stress_response_later_in_life_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -