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Age at diagnosis and age at death in familial prostate cancer.
Oncologist 2009; 14(12):1209-17O

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

A family history of prostate cancer is associated with a higher risk for prostate cancer to first-degree relatives. If greater surveillance of men at familial risk is considered to be useful, population-based estimates of the differences in the age at diagnosis between familial and sporadic prostate cancer cases are needed.

METHODS

The men in the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database were classified according to the number and type of affected first-degree relatives (father or brother) and according to the relative's age at diagnosis. The cumulative incidence of prostate cancer and cumulative prostate cancer-specific mortality were estimated using a stratified Cox model.

RESULTS

The cumulative incidence was highest for men with multiple affected first-degree relatives, and it was higher for brothers than for sons of prostate cancer patients. The age to reach the same cumulative incidence as the general population at age 55 years decreased with decreasing age at diagnosis of the relative, ranging from 48.7 years (father diagnosed before 60 years of age) to 53.7 years (father diagnosed after 82 years of age). Prostate cancer-specific mortality was also related to the number and type of affected relatives but there was no clear evidence for a dependency on the age at diagnosis of the relative.

CONCLUSIONS

Men with a father or a brother affected by prostate cancer are diagnosed and die at earlier ages than men without a family history of prostate cancer. This study should encourage further analysis in order to assess the risks and benefits of screening for prostate cancer in men at higher risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Centre, Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. andreas.brandt@dkfz.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19939895

Citation

Brandt, Andreas, et al. "Age at Diagnosis and Age at Death in Familial Prostate Cancer." The Oncologist, vol. 14, no. 12, 2009, pp. 1209-17.
Brandt A, Bermejo JL, Sundquist J, et al. Age at diagnosis and age at death in familial prostate cancer. Oncologist. 2009;14(12):1209-17.
Brandt, A., Bermejo, J. L., Sundquist, J., & Hemminki, K. (2009). Age at diagnosis and age at death in familial prostate cancer. The Oncologist, 14(12), pp. 1209-17. doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2009-0132.
Brandt A, et al. Age at Diagnosis and Age at Death in Familial Prostate Cancer. Oncologist. 2009;14(12):1209-17. PubMed PMID: 19939895.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Age at diagnosis and age at death in familial prostate cancer. AU - Brandt,Andreas, AU - Bermejo,Justo Lorenzo, AU - Sundquist,Jan, AU - Hemminki,Kari, Y1 - 2009/11/25/ PY - 2009/11/27/entrez PY - 2009/11/27/pubmed PY - 2010/5/14/medline SP - 1209 EP - 17 JF - The oncologist JO - Oncologist VL - 14 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVES: A family history of prostate cancer is associated with a higher risk for prostate cancer to first-degree relatives. If greater surveillance of men at familial risk is considered to be useful, population-based estimates of the differences in the age at diagnosis between familial and sporadic prostate cancer cases are needed. METHODS: The men in the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database were classified according to the number and type of affected first-degree relatives (father or brother) and according to the relative's age at diagnosis. The cumulative incidence of prostate cancer and cumulative prostate cancer-specific mortality were estimated using a stratified Cox model. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence was highest for men with multiple affected first-degree relatives, and it was higher for brothers than for sons of prostate cancer patients. The age to reach the same cumulative incidence as the general population at age 55 years decreased with decreasing age at diagnosis of the relative, ranging from 48.7 years (father diagnosed before 60 years of age) to 53.7 years (father diagnosed after 82 years of age). Prostate cancer-specific mortality was also related to the number and type of affected relatives but there was no clear evidence for a dependency on the age at diagnosis of the relative. CONCLUSIONS: Men with a father or a brother affected by prostate cancer are diagnosed and die at earlier ages than men without a family history of prostate cancer. This study should encourage further analysis in order to assess the risks and benefits of screening for prostate cancer in men at higher risk. SN - 1549-490X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19939895/Age_at_diagnosis_and_age_at_death_in_familial_prostate_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1634/theoncologist.2009-0132 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -