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Health risk assessment of heavy metals via dietary intake of foodstuffs from the wastewater irrigated site of a dry tropical area of India.
Food Chem Toxicol. 2010 Feb; 48(2):611-9.FC

Abstract

The present study was conducted to assess the risk to human health by heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni and Cr) through the intake of locally grown vegetables, cereal crops and milk from wastewater irrigated site. Milk is not directly contaminated due to wastewater irrigation, but is an important route of food chain transfer of heavy metals from grass to animals. Heavy metal concentrations were several fold higher in all the collected samples from wastewater irrigated site compared to clean water irrigated ones. Cd, Pb and Ni concentrations were above the 'safe' limits of Indian and WHO/FAO standards in all the vegetables and cereals, but within the permissible limits in milk samples. The higher values of metal pollution index and health risk index indicated heavy metal contamination in the wastewater irrigated site that presented a significant threat of negative impact on human health. Rice and wheat grains contained less heavy metals as compared to the vegetables, but health risk was greater due to higher contribution of cereals in the diet. The study suggests that wastewater irrigation led to accumulation of heavy metals in food stuff causing potential health risks to consumers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ecology Research Laboratory, Department of Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19941927

Citation

Singh, Anita, et al. "Health Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals Via Dietary Intake of Foodstuffs From the Wastewater Irrigated Site of a Dry Tropical Area of India." Food and Chemical Toxicology : an International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, vol. 48, no. 2, 2010, pp. 611-9.
Singh A, Sharma RK, Agrawal M, et al. Health risk assessment of heavy metals via dietary intake of foodstuffs from the wastewater irrigated site of a dry tropical area of India. Food Chem Toxicol. 2010;48(2):611-9.
Singh, A., Sharma, R. K., Agrawal, M., & Marshall, F. M. (2010). Health risk assessment of heavy metals via dietary intake of foodstuffs from the wastewater irrigated site of a dry tropical area of India. Food and Chemical Toxicology : an International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 48(2), 611-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2009.11.041
Singh A, et al. Health Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals Via Dietary Intake of Foodstuffs From the Wastewater Irrigated Site of a Dry Tropical Area of India. Food Chem Toxicol. 2010;48(2):611-9. PubMed PMID: 19941927.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health risk assessment of heavy metals via dietary intake of foodstuffs from the wastewater irrigated site of a dry tropical area of India. AU - Singh,Anita, AU - Sharma,Rajesh Kumar, AU - Agrawal,Madhoolika, AU - Marshall,Fiona M, Y1 - 2009/11/24/ PY - 2009/08/25/received PY - 2009/11/14/revised PY - 2009/11/19/accepted PY - 2009/11/28/entrez PY - 2009/11/28/pubmed PY - 2010/4/22/medline SP - 611 EP - 9 JF - Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association JO - Food Chem Toxicol VL - 48 IS - 2 N2 - The present study was conducted to assess the risk to human health by heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni and Cr) through the intake of locally grown vegetables, cereal crops and milk from wastewater irrigated site. Milk is not directly contaminated due to wastewater irrigation, but is an important route of food chain transfer of heavy metals from grass to animals. Heavy metal concentrations were several fold higher in all the collected samples from wastewater irrigated site compared to clean water irrigated ones. Cd, Pb and Ni concentrations were above the 'safe' limits of Indian and WHO/FAO standards in all the vegetables and cereals, but within the permissible limits in milk samples. The higher values of metal pollution index and health risk index indicated heavy metal contamination in the wastewater irrigated site that presented a significant threat of negative impact on human health. Rice and wheat grains contained less heavy metals as compared to the vegetables, but health risk was greater due to higher contribution of cereals in the diet. The study suggests that wastewater irrigation led to accumulation of heavy metals in food stuff causing potential health risks to consumers. SN - 1873-6351 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19941927/Health_risk_assessment_of_heavy_metals_via_dietary_intake_of_foodstuffs_from_the_wastewater_irrigated_site_of_a_dry_tropical_area_of_India_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-6915(09)00557-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -