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Household language use and health care access, unmet need, and family impact among CSHCN.
Pediatrics. 2009 Dec; 124 Suppl 4:S414-9.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We examined the association of household language use and access to care among children with special health care needs (CSHCN). From this study we describe the demographics of children and the prevalence of selected access characteristics according to their primary household language and examine the independent effects of household language on health care access, unmet needs, and family impact while controlling for confounding variables.

METHODS

Data from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs, a nationally representative telephone survey of 40,723 CSHCN, were analyzed. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were used to examine disparities and estimate adjusted odds ratios of health care access, satisfaction, and family-impact measures for CSHCN from non-English-primary-language (NEPL) versus English-primary-language (EPL) households.

RESULTS

Nearly 14% of all US children live in NEPL households. NEPL CSHCN were significantly more likely to be Hispanic or other race, be poor, have less educated parents, and reside in metropolitan areas and larger households and yet were less likely to be on cash assistance from welfare. Logistic regression showed that NEPL CSHCN were twice as likely to lack access to a medical home, a usual source of care, and family-centered care. They were 4 times as likely to lack health insurance, and their family members were also more likely to lack adequate insurance. Family members of NEPL children were almost twice as likely to have to stop employment as a result of their child's condition.

CONCLUSIONS

Although limited by program eligibility contingent on immigrant status and state policies, increased referrals to programs such as the State Children's Health Insurance Program and Medicaid can improve access while utilization can be improved by the availability of interpreters, community health workers, linguistically concordant providers, and outreach education efforts of NEPL parents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

US Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, USA. syu@hrsa.govNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19948607

Citation

Yu, Stella M., and Gopal K. Singh. "Household Language Use and Health Care Access, Unmet Need, and Family Impact Among CSHCN." Pediatrics, vol. 124 Suppl 4, 2009, pp. S414-9.
Yu SM, Singh GK. Household language use and health care access, unmet need, and family impact among CSHCN. Pediatrics. 2009;124 Suppl 4:S414-9.
Yu, S. M., & Singh, G. K. (2009). Household language use and health care access, unmet need, and family impact among CSHCN. Pediatrics, 124 Suppl 4, S414-9. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-1255M
Yu SM, Singh GK. Household Language Use and Health Care Access, Unmet Need, and Family Impact Among CSHCN. Pediatrics. 2009;124 Suppl 4:S414-9. PubMed PMID: 19948607.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Household language use and health care access, unmet need, and family impact among CSHCN. AU - Yu,Stella M, AU - Singh,Gopal K, PY - 2009/12/2/entrez PY - 2010/1/9/pubmed PY - 2010/1/23/medline SP - S414 EP - 9 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 124 Suppl 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We examined the association of household language use and access to care among children with special health care needs (CSHCN). From this study we describe the demographics of children and the prevalence of selected access characteristics according to their primary household language and examine the independent effects of household language on health care access, unmet needs, and family impact while controlling for confounding variables. METHODS: Data from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs, a nationally representative telephone survey of 40,723 CSHCN, were analyzed. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were used to examine disparities and estimate adjusted odds ratios of health care access, satisfaction, and family-impact measures for CSHCN from non-English-primary-language (NEPL) versus English-primary-language (EPL) households. RESULTS: Nearly 14% of all US children live in NEPL households. NEPL CSHCN were significantly more likely to be Hispanic or other race, be poor, have less educated parents, and reside in metropolitan areas and larger households and yet were less likely to be on cash assistance from welfare. Logistic regression showed that NEPL CSHCN were twice as likely to lack access to a medical home, a usual source of care, and family-centered care. They were 4 times as likely to lack health insurance, and their family members were also more likely to lack adequate insurance. Family members of NEPL children were almost twice as likely to have to stop employment as a result of their child's condition. CONCLUSIONS: Although limited by program eligibility contingent on immigrant status and state policies, increased referrals to programs such as the State Children's Health Insurance Program and Medicaid can improve access while utilization can be improved by the availability of interpreters, community health workers, linguistically concordant providers, and outreach education efforts of NEPL parents. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19948607/Household_language_use_and_health_care_access_unmet_need_and_family_impact_among_CSHCN_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19948607 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -