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Revising an objective structured clinical examination in a resource-limited Pakistani Medical School.
Educ Health (Abingdon). 2009 May; 22(1):209.EH

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) has not been used extensively in undergraduate medical education in resource-constrained locations, including Pakistan. The Shifa College of Medicine (SCM) in Islamabad modified an end-of-clerkship OSCE assessment in internal medicine for final year medical students from a previous static, pattern-recognition format to an interactive, clinical reasoning and skill-based format.

METHODS

We modified the OSCE to be more dynamic and effective by creating a customized clinical skills laboratory, using standardized patients, developing competency checklists for OSCE stations, and stimulating more active participation from faculty members. Students were surveyed at the end of their medicine clerkship about the OSCE's organization, content, perceived utility and validity and its stressfulness. Faculty involved in the modified format also reported their perceptions in an open-ended survey.

RESULTS

The modified format was generally received positively by students and faculty. Twenty-eight percent of students found the OSCE to be stressful, which is a lower proportion than reported in the literature in other settings. Students suggested that OSCEs should be given more frequently and come with clearer instructions, and they indicated a need for better training in counseling skills. Responses from faculty were generally positive even though the modified format was regarded as more labor-intensive and time-consuming.

CONCLUSION

The OSCE, in its true sense, can be created and successfully implemented to assess the clinical skills of medical students in a resource-limited setting in the developing world.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Shifa College of Medicine, Islamabad, Pakistan. iqmob@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19953439

Citation

Iqbal, Mobeen, et al. "Revising an Objective Structured Clinical Examination in a Resource-limited Pakistani Medical School." Education for Health (Abingdon, England), vol. 22, no. 1, 2009, p. 209.
Iqbal M, Khizar B, Zaidi Z. Revising an objective structured clinical examination in a resource-limited Pakistani Medical School. Educ Health (Abingdon). 2009;22(1):209.
Iqbal, M., Khizar, B., & Zaidi, Z. (2009). Revising an objective structured clinical examination in a resource-limited Pakistani Medical School. Education for Health (Abingdon, England), 22(1), 209.
Iqbal M, Khizar B, Zaidi Z. Revising an Objective Structured Clinical Examination in a Resource-limited Pakistani Medical School. Educ Health (Abingdon). 2009;22(1):209. PubMed PMID: 19953439.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Revising an objective structured clinical examination in a resource-limited Pakistani Medical School. AU - Iqbal,Mobeen, AU - Khizar,Bushra, AU - Zaidi,Zareen, Y1 - 2009/05/08/ PY - 2009/12/3/entrez PY - 2009/12/3/pubmed PY - 2010/2/24/medline SP - 209 EP - 209 JF - Education for health (Abingdon, England) JO - Educ Health (Abingdon) VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) has not been used extensively in undergraduate medical education in resource-constrained locations, including Pakistan. The Shifa College of Medicine (SCM) in Islamabad modified an end-of-clerkship OSCE assessment in internal medicine for final year medical students from a previous static, pattern-recognition format to an interactive, clinical reasoning and skill-based format. METHODS: We modified the OSCE to be more dynamic and effective by creating a customized clinical skills laboratory, using standardized patients, developing competency checklists for OSCE stations, and stimulating more active participation from faculty members. Students were surveyed at the end of their medicine clerkship about the OSCE's organization, content, perceived utility and validity and its stressfulness. Faculty involved in the modified format also reported their perceptions in an open-ended survey. RESULTS: The modified format was generally received positively by students and faculty. Twenty-eight percent of students found the OSCE to be stressful, which is a lower proportion than reported in the literature in other settings. Students suggested that OSCEs should be given more frequently and come with clearer instructions, and they indicated a need for better training in counseling skills. Responses from faculty were generally positive even though the modified format was regarded as more labor-intensive and time-consuming. CONCLUSION: The OSCE, in its true sense, can be created and successfully implemented to assess the clinical skills of medical students in a resource-limited setting in the developing world. SN - 1469-5804 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19953439/Revising_an_objective_structured_clinical_examination_in_a_resource_limited_Pakistani_Medical_School_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -