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Dizziness, migrainous vertigo and psychiatric disorders.
J Laryngol Otol. 2010 Mar; 124(3):285-90.JL

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study sought to establish the prevalence of vestibular disorders, migraine and definite migrainous vertigo in patients with psychiatric disorders who were referred for treatment of dizziness, without a lifetime history of vertigo.

STUDY DESIGN

Retrospective study.

SETTING

Out-patients in a university hospital.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Fifty-two dizzy patients with panic disorders and agoraphobia, 30 with panic disorders without agoraphobia, and 20 with depressive disorders underwent otoneurological screening with bithermal caloric stimulation. The prevalence of migraine and migrainous vertigo was assessed. The level of dizziness was evaluated using the Dizziness Handicap Inventory.

RESULTS

Dizzy patients with panic disorders and agoraphobia had a significantly p = 0.05 regarding the prevalence of peripheral vestibular abnormalities in the group of subjects with PD and agoraphobia and in those with depressive disorders. Migraine was equally represented in the three groups, but panic disorder patients had a higher prevalence of migrainous vertigo definite migrainous vertigo. Almost all patients with a peripheral vestibular disorder had a final diagnosis of definite migrainous vertigo according to Neuhauser criteria. These patients had higher Dizziness Handicap Inventory scores. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory total score was higher in the subgroup of patients with panic disorders with agoraphobia also presenting unilateral reduced caloric responses or definite migrainous vertigo, compared with the subgroup of remaining subjects with panic disorders with agoraphobia (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Our data support the hypothesis that, in patients with panic disorders (and especially those with additional agoraphobia), dizziness may be linked to malfunction of the vestibular system. However, the data are not inconsistent with the hypothesis that migrainous vertigo is the most common pathophysiological mechanism for vestibular disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of ENT, San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy. teggi.roberto@hsr.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19954562

Citation

Teggi, R, et al. "Dizziness, Migrainous Vertigo and Psychiatric Disorders." The Journal of Laryngology and Otology, vol. 124, no. 3, 2010, pp. 285-90.
Teggi R, Caldirola D, Colombo B, et al. Dizziness, migrainous vertigo and psychiatric disorders. J Laryngol Otol. 2010;124(3):285-90.
Teggi, R., Caldirola, D., Colombo, B., Perna, G., Comi, G., Bellodi, L., & Bussi, M. (2010). Dizziness, migrainous vertigo and psychiatric disorders. The Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 124(3), 285-90. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022215109991976
Teggi R, et al. Dizziness, Migrainous Vertigo and Psychiatric Disorders. J Laryngol Otol. 2010;124(3):285-90. PubMed PMID: 19954562.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dizziness, migrainous vertigo and psychiatric disorders. AU - Teggi,R, AU - Caldirola,D, AU - Colombo,B, AU - Perna,G, AU - Comi,G, AU - Bellodi,L, AU - Bussi,M, Y1 - 2009/12/03/ PY - 2009/12/4/entrez PY - 2009/12/4/pubmed PY - 2010/5/15/medline SP - 285 EP - 90 JF - The Journal of laryngology and otology JO - J Laryngol Otol VL - 124 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study sought to establish the prevalence of vestibular disorders, migraine and definite migrainous vertigo in patients with psychiatric disorders who were referred for treatment of dizziness, without a lifetime history of vertigo. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Out-patients in a university hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-two dizzy patients with panic disorders and agoraphobia, 30 with panic disorders without agoraphobia, and 20 with depressive disorders underwent otoneurological screening with bithermal caloric stimulation. The prevalence of migraine and migrainous vertigo was assessed. The level of dizziness was evaluated using the Dizziness Handicap Inventory. RESULTS: Dizzy patients with panic disorders and agoraphobia had a significantly p = 0.05 regarding the prevalence of peripheral vestibular abnormalities in the group of subjects with PD and agoraphobia and in those with depressive disorders. Migraine was equally represented in the three groups, but panic disorder patients had a higher prevalence of migrainous vertigo definite migrainous vertigo. Almost all patients with a peripheral vestibular disorder had a final diagnosis of definite migrainous vertigo according to Neuhauser criteria. These patients had higher Dizziness Handicap Inventory scores. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory total score was higher in the subgroup of patients with panic disorders with agoraphobia also presenting unilateral reduced caloric responses or definite migrainous vertigo, compared with the subgroup of remaining subjects with panic disorders with agoraphobia (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the hypothesis that, in patients with panic disorders (and especially those with additional agoraphobia), dizziness may be linked to malfunction of the vestibular system. However, the data are not inconsistent with the hypothesis that migrainous vertigo is the most common pathophysiological mechanism for vestibular disorders. SN - 1748-5460 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19954562/Dizziness_migrainous_vertigo_and_psychiatric_disorders_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0022215109991976/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -