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Effect of alginate on satiation, appetite, gastric function, and selected gut satiety hormones in overweight and obesity.
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Aug; 18(8):1579-84.O

Abstract

Lack of control of food intake, excess size, and frequency of meals are critical to the development of obesity. The stomach signals satiation postprandially and may play an important role in control of calorie intake. Sodium alginate (based on brown seaweed Laminaria digitata) is currently marketed as a weight loss supplement, but its effects on gastric motor functions and satiation are unknown. We evaluated effects of 10 days treatment with alginate or placebo on gastric functions, satiation, appetite, and gut hormones associated with satiety in overweight or obese adults. We conducted a randomized, 1:1, placebo-controlled, allocation-concealed study in 48 overweight or obese participants with excluded psychiatric comorbidity and binge eating disorder. All underwent measurements of gastric emptying (GE), fasting, and postprandial gastric volumes (GVs), postprandial satiation, calorie intake at a free choice meal and selected gut hormones after 1 week of alginate (three capsules vs. matching placebo per day, ingested 30 min before the main meal). Six capsules were ingested with water 30 min before the GE, GV, and satiation tests on days 8-10. There were no treatment group effects on GE or volumes, gut hormones (ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY)), satiation, total and macronutrient calorie intake at a free choice meal. There was no difference detected in results between obese and overweight patients. Alginate treatment for a period of 10 days showed no effect on gastric motor functions, satiation, appetite, or gut hormones. These results question the use of short-term alginate treatment for weight loss.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Biomedical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19960001

Citation

Odunsi, Suwebatu T., et al. "Effect of Alginate On Satiation, Appetite, Gastric Function, and Selected Gut Satiety Hormones in Overweight and Obesity." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 18, no. 8, 2010, pp. 1579-84.
Odunsi ST, Vázquez-Roque MI, Camilleri M, et al. Effect of alginate on satiation, appetite, gastric function, and selected gut satiety hormones in overweight and obesity. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010;18(8):1579-84.
Odunsi, S. T., Vázquez-Roque, M. I., Camilleri, M., Papathanasopoulos, A., Clark, M. M., Wodrich, L., Lempke, M., McKinzie, S., Ryks, M., Burton, D., & Zinsmeister, A. R. (2010). Effect of alginate on satiation, appetite, gastric function, and selected gut satiety hormones in overweight and obesity. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 18(8), 1579-84. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2009.421
Odunsi ST, et al. Effect of Alginate On Satiation, Appetite, Gastric Function, and Selected Gut Satiety Hormones in Overweight and Obesity. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010;18(8):1579-84. PubMed PMID: 19960001.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of alginate on satiation, appetite, gastric function, and selected gut satiety hormones in overweight and obesity. AU - Odunsi,Suwebatu T, AU - Vázquez-Roque,María I, AU - Camilleri,Michael, AU - Papathanasopoulos,Athanasios, AU - Clark,Matthew M, AU - Wodrich,Lynne, AU - Lempke,Mary, AU - McKinzie,Sanna, AU - Ryks,Michael, AU - Burton,Duane, AU - Zinsmeister,Alan R, Y1 - 2009/12/03/ PY - 2009/12/5/entrez PY - 2009/12/5/pubmed PY - 2011/2/11/medline SP - 1579 EP - 84 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 18 IS - 8 N2 - Lack of control of food intake, excess size, and frequency of meals are critical to the development of obesity. The stomach signals satiation postprandially and may play an important role in control of calorie intake. Sodium alginate (based on brown seaweed Laminaria digitata) is currently marketed as a weight loss supplement, but its effects on gastric motor functions and satiation are unknown. We evaluated effects of 10 days treatment with alginate or placebo on gastric functions, satiation, appetite, and gut hormones associated with satiety in overweight or obese adults. We conducted a randomized, 1:1, placebo-controlled, allocation-concealed study in 48 overweight or obese participants with excluded psychiatric comorbidity and binge eating disorder. All underwent measurements of gastric emptying (GE), fasting, and postprandial gastric volumes (GVs), postprandial satiation, calorie intake at a free choice meal and selected gut hormones after 1 week of alginate (three capsules vs. matching placebo per day, ingested 30 min before the main meal). Six capsules were ingested with water 30 min before the GE, GV, and satiation tests on days 8-10. There were no treatment group effects on GE or volumes, gut hormones (ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY)), satiation, total and macronutrient calorie intake at a free choice meal. There was no difference detected in results between obese and overweight patients. Alginate treatment for a period of 10 days showed no effect on gastric motor functions, satiation, appetite, or gut hormones. These results question the use of short-term alginate treatment for weight loss. SN - 1930-739X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19960001/Effect_of_alginate_on_satiation_appetite_gastric_function_and_selected_gut_satiety_hormones_in_overweight_and_obesity_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -