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Multivitamin use among non-pregnant females of childbearing age in the Western North Carolina multivitamin distribution program.
N C Med J. 2009 Sep-Oct; 70(5):386-90.NC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Daily consumption of 400 mcg of folic acid prior to conception and throughout the first trimester of pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) by 50%-80%. A daily multivitamin with folic acid can ensure that females receive the recommended amount of folic acid during childbearing years.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to determine if vitamin consumption is influenced by providing a free bottle of multivitamins to non-pregnant women of childbearing age during a face-to-face interaction with a health care provider in health departments.

METHODS

An eight-question survey was given to a sample of women who had received a free bottle of multivitamins. Vitamin consumption behavior prior to the intervention was compared to current usage at the time of the survey.

RESULTS

Twenty-five percent of all survey respondents reported taking a daily multivitamin or folic acid tablet before the intervention. Fifty-three percent reported taking a daily multivitamin 8-10 months later, a greater than two-fold increase (PR=2.1). Latino women reported the greatest increase in daily multivitamin intake, from 21% to 70% (PR=3.3).

LIMITATIONS

The results may be difficult to extrapolate to the general population as the survey population differs from the general population. Prior vitamin use was determined by patient recall. The intervention occurred simultaneously with a multifaceted, public folic acid campaign.

CONCLUSIONS

Eight to ten months after receiving a free three-month supply of multivitamins during a face-to-face interaction with a health care provider, the number of participants reporting daily use increased significantly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fullerton Genetics Center, Mission Hospitals, USA. linda.morgan@msj.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19999514

Citation

Morgan, Linda M., et al. "Multivitamin Use Among Non-pregnant Females of Childbearing Age in the Western North Carolina Multivitamin Distribution Program." North Carolina Medical Journal, vol. 70, no. 5, 2009, pp. 386-90.
Morgan LM, Major JL, Meyer RE, et al. Multivitamin use among non-pregnant females of childbearing age in the Western North Carolina multivitamin distribution program. N C Med J. 2009;70(5):386-90.
Morgan, L. M., Major, J. L., Meyer, R. E., & Mullenix, A. (2009). Multivitamin use among non-pregnant females of childbearing age in the Western North Carolina multivitamin distribution program. North Carolina Medical Journal, 70(5), 386-90.
Morgan LM, et al. Multivitamin Use Among Non-pregnant Females of Childbearing Age in the Western North Carolina Multivitamin Distribution Program. N C Med J. 2009 Sep-Oct;70(5):386-90. PubMed PMID: 19999514.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multivitamin use among non-pregnant females of childbearing age in the Western North Carolina multivitamin distribution program. AU - Morgan,Linda M, AU - Major,Judith L, AU - Meyer,Robert E, AU - Mullenix,Amy, PY - 2009/12/17/entrez PY - 2009/12/17/pubmed PY - 2010/2/27/medline SP - 386 EP - 90 JF - North Carolina medical journal JO - N C Med J VL - 70 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Daily consumption of 400 mcg of folic acid prior to conception and throughout the first trimester of pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) by 50%-80%. A daily multivitamin with folic acid can ensure that females receive the recommended amount of folic acid during childbearing years. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine if vitamin consumption is influenced by providing a free bottle of multivitamins to non-pregnant women of childbearing age during a face-to-face interaction with a health care provider in health departments. METHODS: An eight-question survey was given to a sample of women who had received a free bottle of multivitamins. Vitamin consumption behavior prior to the intervention was compared to current usage at the time of the survey. RESULTS: Twenty-five percent of all survey respondents reported taking a daily multivitamin or folic acid tablet before the intervention. Fifty-three percent reported taking a daily multivitamin 8-10 months later, a greater than two-fold increase (PR=2.1). Latino women reported the greatest increase in daily multivitamin intake, from 21% to 70% (PR=3.3). LIMITATIONS: The results may be difficult to extrapolate to the general population as the survey population differs from the general population. Prior vitamin use was determined by patient recall. The intervention occurred simultaneously with a multifaceted, public folic acid campaign. CONCLUSIONS: Eight to ten months after receiving a free three-month supply of multivitamins during a face-to-face interaction with a health care provider, the number of participants reporting daily use increased significantly. SN - 0029-2559 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19999514/Multivitamin_use_among_non_pregnant_females_of_childbearing_age_in_the_Western_North_Carolina_multivitamin_distribution_program_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/womenshealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -