Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Selecting an electronic medical record system for small physician practices.
N C Med J. 2009 Sep-Oct; 70(5):399-403.NC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

While electronic medical record (EMR) systems have demonstrated the potential to improve quality of care and reduce medical errors, relatively few practitioners have implemented EMR systems. This article presents a case study that explores the process by which small physician practices may select an ambulatory EMR system.

METHODS

We assessed the appropriate criteria small practices should use in selecting an EMR system and then evaluated a range of commercially available EMR systems according to cost, functionality, and interoperability with existing systems.

RESULTS

The process for selecting an EMR system starts by creating a budget for start-up costs and monthly maintenance expenses. Next, a practice should evaluate its strategic objectives and current computer infrastructure. The group should then define the appropriate functionality requirements specific for their practice. Finally, a certified ambulatory EMR system that interfaces with existing office systems can be selected.

LIMITATIONS

This case study explores the process of EMR selection for rural, solo physician practices. The ability to generalize the process described herein to broader types of physician practices, such as multi-specialty group practices or to those practices with larger budgets for EMR systems, may be limited.

CONCLUSIONS

Multiple critical and often competing factors--including cost and interoperability with existing systems, as well as organizational goals and obstacles--influence the selection of an EMR system for small physician practices. However, by following a standardized process for selecting an EMR system, small physician practices will find EMR selection to be a relatively straightforward process.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York, USA. nefertiti.dupont@roswellpark.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19999516

Citation

duPont, Nefertiti C., et al. "Selecting an Electronic Medical Record System for Small Physician Practices." North Carolina Medical Journal, vol. 70, no. 5, 2009, pp. 399-403.
duPont NC, Koeninger D, Guyer JD, et al. Selecting an electronic medical record system for small physician practices. N C Med J. 2009;70(5):399-403.
duPont, N. C., Koeninger, D., Guyer, J. D., & Travers, D. (2009). Selecting an electronic medical record system for small physician practices. North Carolina Medical Journal, 70(5), 399-403.
duPont NC, et al. Selecting an Electronic Medical Record System for Small Physician Practices. N C Med J. 2009 Sep-Oct;70(5):399-403. PubMed PMID: 19999516.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Selecting an electronic medical record system for small physician practices. AU - duPont,Nefertiti C, AU - Koeninger,Dayna, AU - Guyer,Joseph D, AU - Travers,Debbie, PY - 2009/12/17/entrez PY - 2009/12/17/pubmed PY - 2010/2/27/medline SP - 399 EP - 403 JF - North Carolina medical journal JO - N C Med J VL - 70 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: While electronic medical record (EMR) systems have demonstrated the potential to improve quality of care and reduce medical errors, relatively few practitioners have implemented EMR systems. This article presents a case study that explores the process by which small physician practices may select an ambulatory EMR system. METHODS: We assessed the appropriate criteria small practices should use in selecting an EMR system and then evaluated a range of commercially available EMR systems according to cost, functionality, and interoperability with existing systems. RESULTS: The process for selecting an EMR system starts by creating a budget for start-up costs and monthly maintenance expenses. Next, a practice should evaluate its strategic objectives and current computer infrastructure. The group should then define the appropriate functionality requirements specific for their practice. Finally, a certified ambulatory EMR system that interfaces with existing office systems can be selected. LIMITATIONS: This case study explores the process of EMR selection for rural, solo physician practices. The ability to generalize the process described herein to broader types of physician practices, such as multi-specialty group practices or to those practices with larger budgets for EMR systems, may be limited. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple critical and often competing factors--including cost and interoperability with existing systems, as well as organizational goals and obstacles--influence the selection of an EMR system for small physician practices. However, by following a standardized process for selecting an EMR system, small physician practices will find EMR selection to be a relatively straightforward process. SN - 0029-2559 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19999516/Selecting_an_electronic_medical_record_system_for_small_physician_practices_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -