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Cloned animal products in the human food chain: FDA should protect American consumers.
Food Drug Law J. 2009; 64(3):473-501.FD

Abstract

Animal cloning is "complex process that lets one exactly copy the genetic, or inherited, traits of an animal." In 1997, Dolly the sheep was the first animal cloned and since then "scientists have used animal cloning to breed dairy cows, beef cattle, poultry, hogs and other species of livestock." Cloned animals are highly attractive to livestock breeders because "cloning essentially produces an identical copy of an animal with superior traits." The main purpose of cloning livestock is "more focused on efficiency and economic benefits of the producer rather than the overall effect of cloning on an animal's physical and mental welfare." The focus of this article is threefold. First, the science behind animal cloning is explained and some potential uses and risks of this technology are explored. Second, FDA's historical evolution, current regulatory authority, and limitations of that authority, is described. Lastly, a new regulatory vision recognizes the realities of 21st century global markets and the dynamic evolution of scientific discovery and technology.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19999640

Citation

Butler, Jennifer E F.. "Cloned Animal Products in the Human Food Chain: FDA Should Protect American Consumers." Food and Drug Law Journal, vol. 64, no. 3, 2009, pp. 473-501.
Butler JE. Cloned animal products in the human food chain: FDA should protect American consumers. Food Drug Law J. 2009;64(3):473-501.
Butler, J. E. (2009). Cloned animal products in the human food chain: FDA should protect American consumers. Food and Drug Law Journal, 64(3), 473-501.
Butler JE. Cloned Animal Products in the Human Food Chain: FDA Should Protect American Consumers. Food Drug Law J. 2009;64(3):473-501. PubMed PMID: 19999640.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cloned animal products in the human food chain: FDA should protect American consumers. A1 - Butler,Jennifer E F, PY - 2009/12/17/entrez PY - 2009/12/17/pubmed PY - 2009/12/23/medline SP - 473 EP - 501 JF - Food and drug law journal JO - Food Drug Law J VL - 64 IS - 3 N2 - Animal cloning is "complex process that lets one exactly copy the genetic, or inherited, traits of an animal." In 1997, Dolly the sheep was the first animal cloned and since then "scientists have used animal cloning to breed dairy cows, beef cattle, poultry, hogs and other species of livestock." Cloned animals are highly attractive to livestock breeders because "cloning essentially produces an identical copy of an animal with superior traits." The main purpose of cloning livestock is "more focused on efficiency and economic benefits of the producer rather than the overall effect of cloning on an animal's physical and mental welfare." The focus of this article is threefold. First, the science behind animal cloning is explained and some potential uses and risks of this technology are explored. Second, FDA's historical evolution, current regulatory authority, and limitations of that authority, is described. Lastly, a new regulatory vision recognizes the realities of 21st century global markets and the dynamic evolution of scientific discovery and technology. SN - 1064-590X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19999640/Cloned_animal_products_in_the_human_food_chain:_FDA_should_protect_American_consumers_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/foodlabeling.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -