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Meta-analysis of the benefits of self-monitoring of blood glucose on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients: an update.
Diabetes Technol Ther 2009; 11(12):775-84DT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Our systematic review and meta-analysis of the benefit of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in improving glycemic control in type 2 diabetes was published in 2008. With the few studies that have emerged afterward, we undertook subsequent meta-analysis of the available evidence to update the results.

METHODS

Clinical trials of SMBG were identified through electronic searches (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library) up to and including June 2009. Studies were included if they met the following inclusion criteria: (1) randomized controlled trial comparing SMBG versus non-SMBG in type 2 diabetes patients not using insulin and (2) hemoglobin A1c (HbA(1c)) reported as an outcome measure. The efficacy was estimated with the mean difference in the changes of HbA(1c) from baseline to final assessment between the SMBG and the non-SMBG groups.

RESULTS

SMBG was effective in reducing HbA(1c) in non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (pooled mean difference, -0.24%; 95% confidence interval, -0.34% to -0.14%; P < 0.00001). Glycemic control significantly improved among the subgroup of patients whose baseline HbA(1c) was >or=8%. In contrast, no significant effect of SMBG was detected in patients who had HbA(1c) <8%.

CONCLUSIONS

The available evidence suggests the usefulness of SMBG in improving glycemic control in non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes as demonstrated by the reduction of HbA(1c) levels. In particular, SMBG proved to be useful in the subgroup of patients whose baseline HbA(1c) was >or=8%.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon-Pathom, Thailand.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20001678

Citation

Poolsup, Nalinee, et al. "Meta-analysis of the Benefits of Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose On Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: an Update." Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, vol. 11, no. 12, 2009, pp. 775-84.
Poolsup N, Suksomboon N, Rattanasookchit S. Meta-analysis of the benefits of self-monitoring of blood glucose on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients: an update. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2009;11(12):775-84.
Poolsup, N., Suksomboon, N., & Rattanasookchit, S. (2009). Meta-analysis of the benefits of self-monitoring of blood glucose on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients: an update. Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, 11(12), pp. 775-84. doi:10.1089/dia.2009.0091.
Poolsup N, Suksomboon N, Rattanasookchit S. Meta-analysis of the Benefits of Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose On Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: an Update. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2009;11(12):775-84. PubMed PMID: 20001678.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meta-analysis of the benefits of self-monitoring of blood glucose on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients: an update. AU - Poolsup,Nalinee, AU - Suksomboon,Naeti, AU - Rattanasookchit,Somying, PY - 2009/12/17/entrez PY - 2009/12/17/pubmed PY - 2010/3/25/medline SP - 775 EP - 84 JF - Diabetes technology & therapeutics JO - Diabetes Technol. Ther. VL - 11 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Our systematic review and meta-analysis of the benefit of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in improving glycemic control in type 2 diabetes was published in 2008. With the few studies that have emerged afterward, we undertook subsequent meta-analysis of the available evidence to update the results. METHODS: Clinical trials of SMBG were identified through electronic searches (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library) up to and including June 2009. Studies were included if they met the following inclusion criteria: (1) randomized controlled trial comparing SMBG versus non-SMBG in type 2 diabetes patients not using insulin and (2) hemoglobin A1c (HbA(1c)) reported as an outcome measure. The efficacy was estimated with the mean difference in the changes of HbA(1c) from baseline to final assessment between the SMBG and the non-SMBG groups. RESULTS: SMBG was effective in reducing HbA(1c) in non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (pooled mean difference, -0.24%; 95% confidence interval, -0.34% to -0.14%; P < 0.00001). Glycemic control significantly improved among the subgroup of patients whose baseline HbA(1c) was >or=8%. In contrast, no significant effect of SMBG was detected in patients who had HbA(1c) <8%. CONCLUSIONS: The available evidence suggests the usefulness of SMBG in improving glycemic control in non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes as demonstrated by the reduction of HbA(1c) levels. In particular, SMBG proved to be useful in the subgroup of patients whose baseline HbA(1c) was >or=8%. SN - 1557-8593 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20001678/Meta_analysis_of_the_benefits_of_self_monitoring_of_blood_glucose_on_glycemic_control_in_type_2_diabetes_patients:_an_update_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/dia.2009.0091?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -