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The effects of biofeedback training of pelvic floor muscles on fecal incontinence.
J Pediatr Surg. 2009 Dec; 44(12):2384-7.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study is to discuss the effect of pelvic floor muscle training on fecal incontinence.

METHODS

A retrospective study was performed on patients who received pelvic floor muscle training from March 2002 to April 2007. There were 55 patients with fecal incontinence (male, 32 cases; female, 23 cases; mean age, 9.4 years old from 6 to 14), including 39 cases of anorectal malformation and 16 cases of Hirschsprung's disease. Pelvic floor muscle training was performed using biofeedback for 2 weeks in hospital, 2 times each day, and 30 minutes each time. The patients were then instructed to carry out self-training at home without the biofeedback device daily and received training evaluations in the hospital outpatient department monthly. All patients completed the training regimen and were followed up for 1 year. Anal manometry and clinical score were evaluated before and after training.

RESULTS

Anal continence of 30 patients had satisfactory improvement, but not for the other 25 cases after training. The mean anal squeeze pressures of the group that had good results and the group that had poor results were 98.4 +/- 7.3 and 47.4 +/- 13.6 mm Hg, respectively, before training. There were 31 patients whose anal squeeze pressures were above 80 mm Hg, and 26 of these had satisfactory anal continence improvement, including all patients with Hirschsprung's disease. On the contrary, only 4 of 24 cases whose anal squeeze pressure was below 80 mm Hg acquired satisfactory anal continence improvement.

CONCLUSIONS

Pelvic floor muscle training could achieve good results in some patients with fecal incontinence. Baseline measurements during anorectal manometry appear to provide good prediction of prognosis and effective management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric Surgery, 2nd Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong 250033, China. sunxiaobing.phd@163.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20006032

Citation

Sun, Xiao-bing, et al. "The Effects of Biofeedback Training of Pelvic Floor Muscles On Fecal Incontinence." Journal of Pediatric Surgery, vol. 44, no. 12, 2009, pp. 2384-7.
Sun XB, Zhang L, Li YH, et al. The effects of biofeedback training of pelvic floor muscles on fecal incontinence. J Pediatr Surg. 2009;44(12):2384-7.
Sun, X. B., Zhang, L., Li, Y. H., Li, J. L., & Chen, Y. L. (2009). The effects of biofeedback training of pelvic floor muscles on fecal incontinence. Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 44(12), 2384-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2009.07.062
Sun XB, et al. The Effects of Biofeedback Training of Pelvic Floor Muscles On Fecal Incontinence. J Pediatr Surg. 2009;44(12):2384-7. PubMed PMID: 20006032.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of biofeedback training of pelvic floor muscles on fecal incontinence. AU - Sun,Xiao-bing, AU - Zhang,Li, AU - Li,Yan-hua, AU - Li,Jin-liang, AU - Chen,Yu-li, PY - 2009/07/29/received PY - 2009/07/31/accepted PY - 2009/12/17/entrez PY - 2009/12/17/pubmed PY - 2010/2/13/medline SP - 2384 EP - 7 JF - Journal of pediatric surgery JO - J. Pediatr. Surg. VL - 44 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to discuss the effect of pelvic floor muscle training on fecal incontinence. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed on patients who received pelvic floor muscle training from March 2002 to April 2007. There were 55 patients with fecal incontinence (male, 32 cases; female, 23 cases; mean age, 9.4 years old from 6 to 14), including 39 cases of anorectal malformation and 16 cases of Hirschsprung's disease. Pelvic floor muscle training was performed using biofeedback for 2 weeks in hospital, 2 times each day, and 30 minutes each time. The patients were then instructed to carry out self-training at home without the biofeedback device daily and received training evaluations in the hospital outpatient department monthly. All patients completed the training regimen and were followed up for 1 year. Anal manometry and clinical score were evaluated before and after training. RESULTS: Anal continence of 30 patients had satisfactory improvement, but not for the other 25 cases after training. The mean anal squeeze pressures of the group that had good results and the group that had poor results were 98.4 +/- 7.3 and 47.4 +/- 13.6 mm Hg, respectively, before training. There were 31 patients whose anal squeeze pressures were above 80 mm Hg, and 26 of these had satisfactory anal continence improvement, including all patients with Hirschsprung's disease. On the contrary, only 4 of 24 cases whose anal squeeze pressure was below 80 mm Hg acquired satisfactory anal continence improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Pelvic floor muscle training could achieve good results in some patients with fecal incontinence. Baseline measurements during anorectal manometry appear to provide good prediction of prognosis and effective management. SN - 1531-5037 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20006032/The_effects_of_biofeedback_training_of_pelvic_floor_muscles_on_fecal_incontinence_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3468(09)00639-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -