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Lumpers and splitters: Darwin, Hooker, and the search for order.
Science. 2009 Dec 11; 326(5959):1496-9.Sci

Abstract

Classification was a key practice of the natural history sciences in the early 19th century, but leading taxonomists disagreed over basic matters, such as how many species the British flora contained. In this arena, the impact of Charles Darwin's ideas was surprisingly limited. For taxonomists like Darwin's friend, Joseph Dalton Hooker, the priority was to establish a reputation as a philosophical naturalist, and to do so Hooker embarked on a survey of global vegetation patterns. He believed that taxonomic "splitters" hindered his ambition to create natural laws for botany (and hence establish it as a prestigious science) by generating a multitude of redundant synonyms for every plant variety. Despite the fact that Darwin's ideas apparently promised a justification for splitting, they also offered a philosophical justification for Hooker's taxonomic practice, and so he enthusiastically championed his friend.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of History, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9SH, UK. j.j.endersby@sussex.ac.uk

Pub Type(s)

Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article
Portrait

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20007893

Citation

Endersby, Jim. "Lumpers and Splitters: Darwin, Hooker, and the Search for Order." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 326, no. 5959, 2009, pp. 1496-9.
Endersby J. Lumpers and splitters: Darwin, Hooker, and the search for order. Science. 2009;326(5959):1496-9.
Endersby, J. (2009). Lumpers and splitters: Darwin, Hooker, and the search for order. Science (New York, N.Y.), 326(5959), 1496-9. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1165915
Endersby J. Lumpers and Splitters: Darwin, Hooker, and the Search for Order. Science. 2009 Dec 11;326(5959):1496-9. PubMed PMID: 20007893.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lumpers and splitters: Darwin, Hooker, and the search for order. A1 - Endersby,Jim, PY - 2009/12/17/entrez PY - 2009/12/17/pubmed PY - 2010/1/13/medline SP - 1496 EP - 9 JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 326 IS - 5959 N2 - Classification was a key practice of the natural history sciences in the early 19th century, but leading taxonomists disagreed over basic matters, such as how many species the British flora contained. In this arena, the impact of Charles Darwin's ideas was surprisingly limited. For taxonomists like Darwin's friend, Joseph Dalton Hooker, the priority was to establish a reputation as a philosophical naturalist, and to do so Hooker embarked on a survey of global vegetation patterns. He believed that taxonomic "splitters" hindered his ambition to create natural laws for botany (and hence establish it as a prestigious science) by generating a multitude of redundant synonyms for every plant variety. Despite the fact that Darwin's ideas apparently promised a justification for splitting, they also offered a philosophical justification for Hooker's taxonomic practice, and so he enthusiastically championed his friend. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20007893/Lumpers_and_splitters:_Darwin_Hooker_and_the_search_for_order_ L2 - http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=20007893 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -