Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Naïve predictions of motion and orientation in mirrors: From what we see to what we expect reflections to do.
Acta Psychol (Amst). 2010 May; 134(1):1-15.AP

Abstract

The study aimed to investigate naïve beliefs regarding the dynamic and static behavior of reflections. In the first three experiments, participants in the study made predictions about the correspondence between real and reflected movements or about the orientation of the reflection of a static object placed in front of a mirror. In Experiments 1 and 2, paper-and-pencil tasks were used and in Experiment 3 participants were asked to make their predictions while imagining that they were facing a mirror. Results revealed that a percentage of undergraduates (ranging from 25% to 35%) were unable to make correct predictions. We classified the errors into types and found that responses either conform to the belief that reflections do the same or that they do the opposite. This suggests an oversimplification of the geometry of mirror reflections in two directions: participants either generalize what they see when movements are parallel to the mirror or what they see when movements are orthogonal to the mirror. Findings from Experiment 4 confirmed that these two expectations fit in with what people perceive in mirrors. Findings from Experiment 5 confirmed that this is also in agreement with the relationship perceived when looking at similar movements and orientations "outside" mirrors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology and Cultural Anthropology, University of Verona, Italy. ugo.savardi@univr.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20015479

Citation

Savardi, Ugo, et al. "Naïve Predictions of Motion and Orientation in Mirrors: From what We See to what We Expect Reflections to Do." Acta Psychologica, vol. 134, no. 1, 2010, pp. 1-15.
Savardi U, Bianchi I, Bertamini M. Naïve predictions of motion and orientation in mirrors: From what we see to what we expect reflections to do. Acta Psychol (Amst). 2010;134(1):1-15.
Savardi, U., Bianchi, I., & Bertamini, M. (2010). Naïve predictions of motion and orientation in mirrors: From what we see to what we expect reflections to do. Acta Psychologica, 134(1), 1-15. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2009.11.008
Savardi U, Bianchi I, Bertamini M. Naïve Predictions of Motion and Orientation in Mirrors: From what We See to what We Expect Reflections to Do. Acta Psychol (Amst). 2010;134(1):1-15. PubMed PMID: 20015479.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Naïve predictions of motion and orientation in mirrors: From what we see to what we expect reflections to do. AU - Savardi,Ugo, AU - Bianchi,Ivana, AU - Bertamini,Marco, Y1 - 2009/12/16/ PY - 2009/04/10/received PY - 2009/11/15/revised PY - 2009/11/16/accepted PY - 2009/12/18/entrez PY - 2009/12/18/pubmed PY - 2010/6/19/medline SP - 1 EP - 15 JF - Acta psychologica JO - Acta Psychol (Amst) VL - 134 IS - 1 N2 - The study aimed to investigate naïve beliefs regarding the dynamic and static behavior of reflections. In the first three experiments, participants in the study made predictions about the correspondence between real and reflected movements or about the orientation of the reflection of a static object placed in front of a mirror. In Experiments 1 and 2, paper-and-pencil tasks were used and in Experiment 3 participants were asked to make their predictions while imagining that they were facing a mirror. Results revealed that a percentage of undergraduates (ranging from 25% to 35%) were unable to make correct predictions. We classified the errors into types and found that responses either conform to the belief that reflections do the same or that they do the opposite. This suggests an oversimplification of the geometry of mirror reflections in two directions: participants either generalize what they see when movements are parallel to the mirror or what they see when movements are orthogonal to the mirror. Findings from Experiment 4 confirmed that these two expectations fit in with what people perceive in mirrors. Findings from Experiment 5 confirmed that this is also in agreement with the relationship perceived when looking at similar movements and orientations "outside" mirrors. SN - 1873-6297 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20015479/Naïve_predictions_of_motion_and_orientation_in_mirrors:_From_what_we_see_to_what_we_expect_reflections_to_do_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0001-6918(09)00167-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -