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Seasonal variation in chemical composition of size-segregated urban air particles and the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung.
Inhal Toxicol. 2010 Jan; 22(1):17-32.IT

Abstract

We investigated the seasonal variations in the chemical composition and in vivo inflammatory activity of urban air particulate samples in four size ranges (PM(10-2.5), PM(2.5-1), PM(1-0.2), and PM(0.2)). The samples were collected in Helsinki using a high-volume cascade impactor (HVCI). Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. The lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, interleukin [IL]-6, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine [KC]) at 4 h, and total cell number and total protein concentration at 12 h. The PM(10-2.5) and PM(2.5-1) samples had much higher inflammatory potency than the PM(1-0.2) and PM(0.2) samples. The relative inflammatory activities of the autumn samples were the highest on an equal mass basis, but when estimated for the particulate mass per cubic meter of air, the springtime samples had the highest inflammatory potential. Resuspended soil material and other non-exhaust particulate material from traffic were associated with a high inflammatory activity of the PM(10-2.5) and PM(2.5-1) samples. Secondary inorganic ions in the PM(1-0.2) and PM(0.2) samples had inconsistent negative or positive correlations with the inflammatory activity. There were no systematic seasonal variations in the tracers of incomplete combustion and atmospherically oxidized organics in the PM(1-0.2) and PM(0.2) samples, which probably explains their low correlations with the inflammatory activity. In conclusion, in a relatively clean Nordic city, the resuspension of road dust and other non-exhaust particulate material from traffic were the major sources of inflammatory activity of urban air inhalable particles.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, Kuopio, Finland. Mikko.Happo@thl.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20017591

Citation

Happo, M S., et al. "Seasonal Variation in Chemical Composition of Size-segregated Urban Air Particles and the Inflammatory Activity in the Mouse Lung." Inhalation Toxicology, vol. 22, no. 1, 2010, pp. 17-32.
Happo MS, Hirvonen MR, Hälinen AI, et al. Seasonal variation in chemical composition of size-segregated urban air particles and the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. Inhal Toxicol. 2010;22(1):17-32.
Happo, M. S., Hirvonen, M. R., Hälinen, A. I., Jalava, P. I., Pennanen, A. S., Sillanpää, M., Hillamo, R., & Salonen, R. O. (2010). Seasonal variation in chemical composition of size-segregated urban air particles and the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. Inhalation Toxicology, 22(1), 17-32. https://doi.org/10.3109/08958370902862426
Happo MS, et al. Seasonal Variation in Chemical Composition of Size-segregated Urban Air Particles and the Inflammatory Activity in the Mouse Lung. Inhal Toxicol. 2010;22(1):17-32. PubMed PMID: 20017591.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Seasonal variation in chemical composition of size-segregated urban air particles and the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. AU - Happo,M S, AU - Hirvonen,M-R, AU - Hälinen,A I, AU - Jalava,P I, AU - Pennanen,A S, AU - Sillanpää,M, AU - Hillamo,R, AU - Salonen,R O, PY - 2009/12/19/entrez PY - 2009/12/19/pubmed PY - 2010/2/24/medline SP - 17 EP - 32 JF - Inhalation toxicology JO - Inhal Toxicol VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - We investigated the seasonal variations in the chemical composition and in vivo inflammatory activity of urban air particulate samples in four size ranges (PM(10-2.5), PM(2.5-1), PM(1-0.2), and PM(0.2)). The samples were collected in Helsinki using a high-volume cascade impactor (HVCI). Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. The lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, interleukin [IL]-6, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine [KC]) at 4 h, and total cell number and total protein concentration at 12 h. The PM(10-2.5) and PM(2.5-1) samples had much higher inflammatory potency than the PM(1-0.2) and PM(0.2) samples. The relative inflammatory activities of the autumn samples were the highest on an equal mass basis, but when estimated for the particulate mass per cubic meter of air, the springtime samples had the highest inflammatory potential. Resuspended soil material and other non-exhaust particulate material from traffic were associated with a high inflammatory activity of the PM(10-2.5) and PM(2.5-1) samples. Secondary inorganic ions in the PM(1-0.2) and PM(0.2) samples had inconsistent negative or positive correlations with the inflammatory activity. There were no systematic seasonal variations in the tracers of incomplete combustion and atmospherically oxidized organics in the PM(1-0.2) and PM(0.2) samples, which probably explains their low correlations with the inflammatory activity. In conclusion, in a relatively clean Nordic city, the resuspension of road dust and other non-exhaust particulate material from traffic were the major sources of inflammatory activity of urban air inhalable particles. SN - 1091-7691 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20017591/Seasonal_variation_in_chemical_composition_of_size_segregated_urban_air_particles_and_the_inflammatory_activity_in_the_mouse_lung_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/08958370902862426 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -