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Neurophilosophy and the distal hyperuranic world: Fred Previc's space of the gods (and of men).
Funct Neurol. 2009 Jul-Sep; 24(3):121-8.FN

Abstract

Unlike the concept handed down by philosophy (and by the philosophy of science), which proposes a univocal, intellectualistic vision of space, Previc's studies have shown that the relationship between consciousness and space is instead managed by a number of modules, making it possible to categorise spatial interaction on four levels which correspond to the different ways in which we project our existence in different practical and cultural scenarios. What emerges as particularly important is the fourth level of the management of spatiality, the one that sees human consciousness dealing with the great distances - the heavens, the house of the gods. This module makes use of a neural pathway involving ventral sensory structures that also manage the relationship with religion and transcendence. But these are also the structures that are activated when populations are forced to set out in search of new lands - the quest for the eternal "Promised Land". In this study of infinite spaces, the path of the gods and of men coincide and they are seen to advance along it together.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Brain Connectivity Center, IRCCS C Mondino Institute of Neurology Foundation, Pavia, Italy. pmila@tiscali.it

Pub Type(s)

Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20018138

Citation

Milanesi, P G.. "Neurophilosophy and the Distal Hyperuranic World: Fred Previc's Space of the Gods (and of Men)." Functional Neurology, vol. 24, no. 3, 2009, pp. 121-8.
Milanesi PG. Neurophilosophy and the distal hyperuranic world: Fred Previc's space of the gods (and of men). Funct Neurol. 2009;24(3):121-8.
Milanesi, P. G. (2009). Neurophilosophy and the distal hyperuranic world: Fred Previc's space of the gods (and of men). Functional Neurology, 24(3), 121-8.
Milanesi PG. Neurophilosophy and the Distal Hyperuranic World: Fred Previc's Space of the Gods (and of Men). Funct Neurol. 2009 Jul-Sep;24(3):121-8. PubMed PMID: 20018138.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neurophilosophy and the distal hyperuranic world: Fred Previc's space of the gods (and of men). A1 - Milanesi,P G, PY - 2009/12/19/entrez PY - 2009/12/19/pubmed PY - 2010/4/21/medline SP - 121 EP - 8 JF - Functional neurology JO - Funct. Neurol. VL - 24 IS - 3 N2 - Unlike the concept handed down by philosophy (and by the philosophy of science), which proposes a univocal, intellectualistic vision of space, Previc's studies have shown that the relationship between consciousness and space is instead managed by a number of modules, making it possible to categorise spatial interaction on four levels which correspond to the different ways in which we project our existence in different practical and cultural scenarios. What emerges as particularly important is the fourth level of the management of spatiality, the one that sees human consciousness dealing with the great distances - the heavens, the house of the gods. This module makes use of a neural pathway involving ventral sensory structures that also manage the relationship with religion and transcendence. But these are also the structures that are activated when populations are forced to set out in search of new lands - the quest for the eternal "Promised Land". In this study of infinite spaces, the path of the gods and of men coincide and they are seen to advance along it together. SN - 0393-5264 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20018138/Neurophilosophy_and_the_distal_hyperuranic_world:_Fred_Previc's_space_of_the_gods__and_of_men__ L2 - http://www.functionalneurology.com/index.php?PAGE=article&ID=3877 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -