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Hypertension is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion in patients with nephrolithiasis.
J Urol 2010; 183(2):576-9JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

The epidemiological relationship between nephrolithiasis and hypertension is well-known. Patients with hypertension are at increased risk for nephrolithiasis and those with nephrolithiasis are at risk for hypertension. Urine calcium or urine citrate may be related to hypertension status. We examined the relationship between hypertension and 24-hour urine composition in patients with nephrolithiasis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We retrospectively reviewed the database on 462 stone forming patients to examine the relationship between hypertension and 24-hour urine composition. Multivariate linear regression models were adjusted for age, race, gender, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and 24-hour urine constituents. Nominal logistic regression was also done to examine the hypertension prevalence by quintile of calcium and citrate excretion.

RESULTS

On adjusted multivariate analysis compared with normotensive stone formers those with hypertension excreted 25.6 mg per day more urine calcium, corresponding to a 12% increase in urinary calcium excretion. The relative risk of hypertension was significantly associated with quintile of calcium excretion but not with quintile of citrate excretion (1.29, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.61 vs 0.94, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.14).

CONCLUSIONS

In stone formers hypertension was associated only with significantly increased urine calcium. This association is important when treating patients with nephrolithiasis since those with hypertension may require unique dietary and medical therapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. beisner@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20018328

Citation

Eisner, Brian H., et al. "Hypertension Is Associated With Increased Urinary Calcium Excretion in Patients With Nephrolithiasis." The Journal of Urology, vol. 183, no. 2, 2010, pp. 576-9.
Eisner BH, Porten SP, Bechis SK, et al. Hypertension is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion in patients with nephrolithiasis. J Urol. 2010;183(2):576-9.
Eisner, B. H., Porten, S. P., Bechis, S. K., & Stoller, M. L. (2010). Hypertension is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion in patients with nephrolithiasis. The Journal of Urology, 183(2), pp. 576-9. doi:10.1016/j.juro.2009.10.011.
Eisner BH, et al. Hypertension Is Associated With Increased Urinary Calcium Excretion in Patients With Nephrolithiasis. J Urol. 2010;183(2):576-9. PubMed PMID: 20018328.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hypertension is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion in patients with nephrolithiasis. AU - Eisner,Brian H, AU - Porten,Sima P, AU - Bechis,Seth K, AU - Stoller,Marshall L, Y1 - 2009/12/16/ PY - 2009/06/09/received PY - 2009/12/19/entrez PY - 2009/12/19/pubmed PY - 2010/2/24/medline SP - 576 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J. Urol. VL - 183 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: The epidemiological relationship between nephrolithiasis and hypertension is well-known. Patients with hypertension are at increased risk for nephrolithiasis and those with nephrolithiasis are at risk for hypertension. Urine calcium or urine citrate may be related to hypertension status. We examined the relationship between hypertension and 24-hour urine composition in patients with nephrolithiasis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the database on 462 stone forming patients to examine the relationship between hypertension and 24-hour urine composition. Multivariate linear regression models were adjusted for age, race, gender, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and 24-hour urine constituents. Nominal logistic regression was also done to examine the hypertension prevalence by quintile of calcium and citrate excretion. RESULTS: On adjusted multivariate analysis compared with normotensive stone formers those with hypertension excreted 25.6 mg per day more urine calcium, corresponding to a 12% increase in urinary calcium excretion. The relative risk of hypertension was significantly associated with quintile of calcium excretion but not with quintile of citrate excretion (1.29, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.61 vs 0.94, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.14). CONCLUSIONS: In stone formers hypertension was associated only with significantly increased urine calcium. This association is important when treating patients with nephrolithiasis since those with hypertension may require unique dietary and medical therapy. SN - 1527-3792 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20018328/Hypertension_is_associated_with_increased_urinary_calcium_excretion_in_patients_with_nephrolithiasis_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/full/10.1016/j.juro.2009.10.011?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -