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Intoxication with bourbon versus vodka: effects on hangover, sleep, and next-day neurocognitive performance in young adults.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2010; 34(3):509-18AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This study assessed the effects of heavy drinking with high or low congener beverages on next-day neurocognitive performance, and the extent to which these effects were mediated by alcohol-related sleep disturbance or alcoholic beverage congeners, and correlated with the intensity of hangover.

METHODS

Healthy heavy drinkers age 21 to 33 (n = 95) participated in 2 drinking nights after an acclimatization night. They drank to a mean of 0.11 g% breath alcohol concentration on vodka or bourbon one night with matched placebo the other night, randomized for type and order. Polysomnography recordings were made overnight; self-report and neurocognitive measures were assessed the next morning.

RESULTS

After alcohol, people had more hangover and more decrements in tests requiring both sustained attention and speed. Hangover correlated with poorer performance on these measures. Alcohol decreased sleep efficiency and rapid eye movement sleep, and increased wake time and next-day sleepiness. Alcohol effects on sleep correlated with hangover but did not mediate the effects on performance. No effect of beverage congeners was found except on hangover severity, with people feeling worse after bourbon. Virtually no sex differences appeared.

CONCLUSIONS

As drinking to this level affects complex cognitive abilities, safety could be affected, with implications for driving and for safety-sensitive occupations. Congener content affects only how people feel the next day so does not increase risk. The sleep disrupting effects of alcohol did not account for the impaired performance so other mechanisms of effect need to be sought. As hangover symptoms correlate with impaired performance, these might be contributing to the impairment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912, USA. Damaris_Rohsenow@brown.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20028364

Citation

Rohsenow, Damaris J., et al. "Intoxication With Bourbon Versus Vodka: Effects On Hangover, Sleep, and Next-day Neurocognitive Performance in Young Adults." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 34, no. 3, 2010, pp. 509-18.
Rohsenow DJ, Howland J, Arnedt JT, et al. Intoxication with bourbon versus vodka: effects on hangover, sleep, and next-day neurocognitive performance in young adults. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2010;34(3):509-18.
Rohsenow, D. J., Howland, J., Arnedt, J. T., Almeida, A. B., Greece, J., Minsky, S., ... Sales, S. (2010). Intoxication with bourbon versus vodka: effects on hangover, sleep, and next-day neurocognitive performance in young adults. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 34(3), pp. 509-18. doi:10.1111/j.1530-0277.2009.01116.x.
Rohsenow DJ, et al. Intoxication With Bourbon Versus Vodka: Effects On Hangover, Sleep, and Next-day Neurocognitive Performance in Young Adults. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2010 Mar 1;34(3):509-18. PubMed PMID: 20028364.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intoxication with bourbon versus vodka: effects on hangover, sleep, and next-day neurocognitive performance in young adults. AU - Rohsenow,Damaris J, AU - Howland,Jonathan, AU - Arnedt,J Todd, AU - Almeida,Alissa B, AU - Greece,Jacey, AU - Minsky,Sara, AU - Kempler,Carrie S, AU - Sales,Suzanne, Y1 - 2009/12/17/ PY - 2009/12/24/entrez PY - 2009/12/24/pubmed PY - 2010/8/4/medline SP - 509 EP - 18 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 34 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: This study assessed the effects of heavy drinking with high or low congener beverages on next-day neurocognitive performance, and the extent to which these effects were mediated by alcohol-related sleep disturbance or alcoholic beverage congeners, and correlated with the intensity of hangover. METHODS: Healthy heavy drinkers age 21 to 33 (n = 95) participated in 2 drinking nights after an acclimatization night. They drank to a mean of 0.11 g% breath alcohol concentration on vodka or bourbon one night with matched placebo the other night, randomized for type and order. Polysomnography recordings were made overnight; self-report and neurocognitive measures were assessed the next morning. RESULTS: After alcohol, people had more hangover and more decrements in tests requiring both sustained attention and speed. Hangover correlated with poorer performance on these measures. Alcohol decreased sleep efficiency and rapid eye movement sleep, and increased wake time and next-day sleepiness. Alcohol effects on sleep correlated with hangover but did not mediate the effects on performance. No effect of beverage congeners was found except on hangover severity, with people feeling worse after bourbon. Virtually no sex differences appeared. CONCLUSIONS: As drinking to this level affects complex cognitive abilities, safety could be affected, with implications for driving and for safety-sensitive occupations. Congener content affects only how people feel the next day so does not increase risk. The sleep disrupting effects of alcohol did not account for the impaired performance so other mechanisms of effect need to be sought. As hangover symptoms correlate with impaired performance, these might be contributing to the impairment. SN - 1530-0277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20028364/Intoxication_with_bourbon_versus_vodka:_effects_on_hangover_sleep_and_next_day_neurocognitive_performance_in_young_adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2009.01116.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -