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Intent to receive influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccines - two counties, North Carolina, August 2009.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009 Dec 25; 58(50):1401-5.MM

Abstract

On September 15, 2009, the Food and Drug Administration approved the manufacture of four influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines. Before release of the first batches of the vaccine on September 30, intent to receive the vaccine was estimated at 50% among selected U.S. adult populations and as high as 70% for children. However, studies in previous years of seasonal influenza vaccination in children, who might require 2 doses based on age and prior vaccination status, have indicated poor compliance with recommendations. To measure intent to receive H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines among children and adults, during August 28-29, 2009, the North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness, with state and local public health officials, conducted a community assessment in two counties. This report summarizes the results of that assessment, which determined that 64% of adults reported intent to receive H1N1 vaccine. In addition, 65% of parents reported intent to have all their children (aged 6 months to <18 years) vaccinated with H1N1 vaccine, and 51% said they would have all their children vaccinated with both H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines. The most commonly reported reasons for not intending to receive H1N1 vaccine were belief in a low likelihood of infection (18%) and concern over vaccine side effects (14%); 85% of participants said they received their H1N1 information from television. To increase coverage with H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines, public health departments should use television to focus public health messages on the risks for infection and severe illness and the safety profile of the vaccine.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20032923

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Intent to Receive Influenza a (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent and Seasonal Influenza Vaccines - Two Counties, North Carolina, August 2009." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 58, no. 50, 2009, pp. 1401-5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Intent to receive influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccines - two counties, North Carolina, August 2009. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009;58(50):1401-5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2009). Intent to receive influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccines - two counties, North Carolina, August 2009. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 58(50), 1401-5.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Intent to Receive Influenza a (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent and Seasonal Influenza Vaccines - Two Counties, North Carolina, August 2009. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009 Dec 25;58(50):1401-5. PubMed PMID: 20032923.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intent to receive influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent and seasonal influenza vaccines - two counties, North Carolina, August 2009. A1 - ,, PY - 2009/12/25/entrez PY - 2009/12/25/pubmed PY - 2010/1/1/medline SP - 1401 EP - 5 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 58 IS - 50 N2 - On September 15, 2009, the Food and Drug Administration approved the manufacture of four influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccines. Before release of the first batches of the vaccine on September 30, intent to receive the vaccine was estimated at 50% among selected U.S. adult populations and as high as 70% for children. However, studies in previous years of seasonal influenza vaccination in children, who might require 2 doses based on age and prior vaccination status, have indicated poor compliance with recommendations. To measure intent to receive H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines among children and adults, during August 28-29, 2009, the North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness, with state and local public health officials, conducted a community assessment in two counties. This report summarizes the results of that assessment, which determined that 64% of adults reported intent to receive H1N1 vaccine. In addition, 65% of parents reported intent to have all their children (aged 6 months to <18 years) vaccinated with H1N1 vaccine, and 51% said they would have all their children vaccinated with both H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines. The most commonly reported reasons for not intending to receive H1N1 vaccine were belief in a low likelihood of infection (18%) and concern over vaccine side effects (14%); 85% of participants said they received their H1N1 information from television. To increase coverage with H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines, public health departments should use television to focus public health messages on the risks for infection and severe illness and the safety profile of the vaccine. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20032923/Intent_to_receive_influenza_A__H1N1__2009_monovalent_and_seasonal_influenza_vaccines___two_counties_North_Carolina_August_2009_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5850a1.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -