Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Novel influenza A(H1N1) in a pediatric health care facility in New York City during the first wave of the 2009 pandemic.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010 Jan; 164(1):24-30.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the burden of care experienced by our pediatric health care facility in New York, New York, from May 3, 2009, to July 31, 2009, during the novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic that began in spring 2009.

DESIGN

Retrospective case series.

SETTING

Pediatric emergency departments and inpatient facilities of New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Patients Children presenting to the emergency departments with influenza-like illness (ILI) and children aged 18 years or younger hospitalized with positive laboratory test results for influenza A from May 3, 2009, to July 31, 2009.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Proportion of children with ILI who were hospitalized and proportion of hospitalized children with influenza A with respiratory failure, bacterial superinfection, and mortality.

RESULTS

When compared with the same period in 2008, the pediatric emergency departments experienced an excess of 3750 visits (19.9% increase). Overall, 27.7% of visits were for ILI; 2.5% of patients with ILI were hospitalized. Of the 115 hospitalized subjects with confirmed influenza A (median age, 4.3 years), 93 (80.9%) had underlying conditions. Four (3.5%) had identified bacterial superinfection, 1 (0.9%) died, and 35 (30.4%) were admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit; of these 35 patients, 11 had pneumonia and required mechanical ventilation, including high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (n = 3).

CONCLUSIONS

At our center, 2.5% of children with ILI presenting to the emergency departments during the first wave of the 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic were hospitalized. Of the 115 hospitalized children with confirmed influenza A, 9.6% had respiratory failure and 0.9% died. These findings can be compared with the disease severity of subsequent waves of the 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20048238

Citation

Miroballi, Yolanda, et al. "Novel Influenza A(H1N1) in a Pediatric Health Care Facility in New York City During the First Wave of the 2009 Pandemic." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 164, no. 1, 2010, pp. 24-30.
Miroballi Y, Baird JS, Zackai S, et al. Novel influenza A(H1N1) in a pediatric health care facility in New York City during the first wave of the 2009 pandemic. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(1):24-30.
Miroballi, Y., Baird, J. S., Zackai, S., Cannon, J. M., Messina, M., Ravindranath, T., Green, R., Della-Latta, P., Jenkins, S., Greenwald, B. M., Furuya, E. Y., Graham, P. L., Sonnett, F. M., Platt, S., Delamora, P., & Saiman, L. (2010). Novel influenza A(H1N1) in a pediatric health care facility in New York City during the first wave of the 2009 pandemic. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 164(1), 24-30. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.259
Miroballi Y, et al. Novel Influenza A(H1N1) in a Pediatric Health Care Facility in New York City During the First Wave of the 2009 Pandemic. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(1):24-30. PubMed PMID: 20048238.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Novel influenza A(H1N1) in a pediatric health care facility in New York City during the first wave of the 2009 pandemic. AU - Miroballi,Yolanda, AU - Baird,J Scott, AU - Zackai,Sheemon, AU - Cannon,Jean-Marie, AU - Messina,Maria, AU - Ravindranath,Thyyar, AU - Green,Robert, AU - Della-Latta,Phyllis, AU - Jenkins,Stephen, AU - Greenwald,Bruce M, AU - Furuya,E Yoko, AU - Graham,Philip L,3rd AU - Sonnett,F Meridith, AU - Platt,Shari, AU - Delamora,Patricia, AU - Saiman,Lisa, PY - 2010/1/6/entrez PY - 2010/1/6/pubmed PY - 2010/1/26/medline SP - 24 EP - 30 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 164 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe the burden of care experienced by our pediatric health care facility in New York, New York, from May 3, 2009, to July 31, 2009, during the novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic that began in spring 2009. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. SETTING: Pediatric emergency departments and inpatient facilities of New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Patients Children presenting to the emergency departments with influenza-like illness (ILI) and children aged 18 years or younger hospitalized with positive laboratory test results for influenza A from May 3, 2009, to July 31, 2009. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of children with ILI who were hospitalized and proportion of hospitalized children with influenza A with respiratory failure, bacterial superinfection, and mortality. RESULTS: When compared with the same period in 2008, the pediatric emergency departments experienced an excess of 3750 visits (19.9% increase). Overall, 27.7% of visits were for ILI; 2.5% of patients with ILI were hospitalized. Of the 115 hospitalized subjects with confirmed influenza A (median age, 4.3 years), 93 (80.9%) had underlying conditions. Four (3.5%) had identified bacterial superinfection, 1 (0.9%) died, and 35 (30.4%) were admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit; of these 35 patients, 11 had pneumonia and required mechanical ventilation, including high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (n = 3). CONCLUSIONS: At our center, 2.5% of children with ILI presenting to the emergency departments during the first wave of the 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic were hospitalized. Of the 115 hospitalized children with confirmed influenza A, 9.6% had respiratory failure and 0.9% died. These findings can be compared with the disease severity of subsequent waves of the 2009 novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic. SN - 1538-3628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20048238/Novel_influenza_A_H1N1__in_a_pediatric_health_care_facility_in_New_York_City_during_the_first_wave_of_the_2009_pandemic_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.259 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -