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Intimate partner violence: development of a brief risk assessment for the emergency department.
Acad Emerg Med. 2009 Nov; 16(11):1208-16.AE

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Women assaulted by intimate partners are frequently patients in emergency departments (EDs). Many victims and health care providers fail to take into account the potential risks of repeat partner violence. The objective of this study was to use data from a larger study of domestic violence risk assessment methods to develop a brief assessment for acute care settings to identify victims at highest risk for suffering severe injury or potentially lethal assault by an intimate partner or former partner.

METHODS

Victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) were interviewed twice between 2002 and 2004. The baseline interview included the 20 items of Campbell's Danger Assessment (DA; predictor). The follow-up interview, conducted 9 months later on average, assessed abuse inflicted since the baseline interview (outcome). Multiple logistic regression was used to identify questions on the DA most predictive of severe abuse and potentially lethal assaults. Female IPV victims were recruited from New York City family courts, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department 9-1-1 calls, New York City and Los Angeles shelters, and New York City hospitals; 666 women responded to the DA at baseline, and 60% participated in follow-up interviews.

RESULTS

Severe injuries or potentially lethal assaults were experienced by 14.9% of retained study participants between the baseline and follow-up interviews. The best brief prediction instrument has five questions. A positive answer to any three questions has a sensitivity of 83% (95% confidence interval = 70.6% to 91.4%).

CONCLUSIONS

This instrument can help predict which victims may be at increased risk for severe injury or potentially lethal assault and can aid clinicians in differentiating which patients require comprehensive safety interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Emergency Department, St. Michael's Hospital, and the Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sniderc@smh.toronto.on.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20053241

Citation

Snider, Carolyn, et al. "Intimate Partner Violence: Development of a Brief Risk Assessment for the Emergency Department." Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 16, no. 11, 2009, pp. 1208-16.
Snider C, Webster D, O'Sullivan CS, et al. Intimate partner violence: development of a brief risk assessment for the emergency department. Acad Emerg Med. 2009;16(11):1208-16.
Snider, C., Webster, D., O'Sullivan, C. S., & Campbell, J. (2009). Intimate partner violence: development of a brief risk assessment for the emergency department. Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 16(11), 1208-16. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1553-2712.2009.00457.x
Snider C, et al. Intimate Partner Violence: Development of a Brief Risk Assessment for the Emergency Department. Acad Emerg Med. 2009;16(11):1208-16. PubMed PMID: 20053241.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intimate partner violence: development of a brief risk assessment for the emergency department. AU - Snider,Carolyn, AU - Webster,Daniel, AU - O'Sullivan,Chris S, AU - Campbell,Jacquelyn, PY - 2010/1/8/entrez PY - 2010/1/8/pubmed PY - 2010/3/31/medline SP - 1208 EP - 16 JF - Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine JO - Acad Emerg Med VL - 16 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Women assaulted by intimate partners are frequently patients in emergency departments (EDs). Many victims and health care providers fail to take into account the potential risks of repeat partner violence. The objective of this study was to use data from a larger study of domestic violence risk assessment methods to develop a brief assessment for acute care settings to identify victims at highest risk for suffering severe injury or potentially lethal assault by an intimate partner or former partner. METHODS: Victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) were interviewed twice between 2002 and 2004. The baseline interview included the 20 items of Campbell's Danger Assessment (DA; predictor). The follow-up interview, conducted 9 months later on average, assessed abuse inflicted since the baseline interview (outcome). Multiple logistic regression was used to identify questions on the DA most predictive of severe abuse and potentially lethal assaults. Female IPV victims were recruited from New York City family courts, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department 9-1-1 calls, New York City and Los Angeles shelters, and New York City hospitals; 666 women responded to the DA at baseline, and 60% participated in follow-up interviews. RESULTS: Severe injuries or potentially lethal assaults were experienced by 14.9% of retained study participants between the baseline and follow-up interviews. The best brief prediction instrument has five questions. A positive answer to any three questions has a sensitivity of 83% (95% confidence interval = 70.6% to 91.4%). CONCLUSIONS: This instrument can help predict which victims may be at increased risk for severe injury or potentially lethal assault and can aid clinicians in differentiating which patients require comprehensive safety interventions. SN - 1553-2712 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20053241/Intimate_partner_violence:_development_of_a_brief_risk_assessment_for_the_emergency_department_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -