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Indices of central and peripheral body fat: association with non-fatal acute myocardial infarction.
Int J Obes (Lond) 2010; 34(4):733-41IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The majority of the studies have focused on the effect of general and central fat on coronary risk, neglecting the potential role of peripheral body fat.

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effect of surrogate measures for general, central and peripheral body fat on the occurrence of non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

METHODS

Population-based case-control study; cases were patients aged >or=40 years consecutively hospitalized with an incident AMI (n=653), and controls were community participants without previous AMI, selected randomly from the hospitals' catchment area population (n=1713). Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference and a skinfolds composite index to estimate the proportion of peripheral subcutaneous fat in the arms were ascertained. Associations were summarized with odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), obtained from unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for the main confounders.

RESULTS

WC, and in particular waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), had strong direct associations with AMI risk. Peripheral subcutaneous fat was inversely associated with AMI in women, but directly in men. Using principal component analysis, three uncorrelated factors were identified representing different patterns of fat distribution: (1) generalized fat, with high BMI and high WC; (2) central fat, with high WC and WHR; and (3) peripheral subcutaneous fat. The first factor showed no significant association with AMI, but the second factor increased AMI risk in each sex (upper vs lower fourth: OR 12.2, 95% CI 5.34-27.9 in women; OR 25.0, 95% CI 14.0-44.7 in men). In contrast, the third factor was inversely associated with AMI in women (upper vs lower fourth: OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.36-0.96) and directly associated in men (OR 2.45, 95% CI 1.69-3.55; P-value for sex interaction<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Central fat was associated with increased risk of AMI in women and men, while the peripheral subcutaneous fat index predicted a lower risk of AMI in women and a higher risk in men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology and Cardiovascular Research & Development Unit, University of Porto Medical School, Porto, Portugal. acmatos@med.up.ptNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20065979

Citation

Oliveira, A, et al. "Indices of Central and Peripheral Body Fat: Association With Non-fatal Acute Myocardial Infarction." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 34, no. 4, 2010, pp. 733-41.
Oliveira A, Rodríguez-Artalejo F, Severo M, et al. Indices of central and peripheral body fat: association with non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Int J Obes (Lond). 2010;34(4):733-41.
Oliveira, A., Rodríguez-Artalejo, F., Severo, M., & Lopes, C. (2010). Indices of central and peripheral body fat: association with non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 34(4), pp. 733-41. doi:10.1038/ijo.2009.281.
Oliveira A, et al. Indices of Central and Peripheral Body Fat: Association With Non-fatal Acute Myocardial Infarction. Int J Obes (Lond). 2010;34(4):733-41. PubMed PMID: 20065979.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Indices of central and peripheral body fat: association with non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. AU - Oliveira,A, AU - Rodríguez-Artalejo,F, AU - Severo,M, AU - Lopes,C, Y1 - 2010/01/12/ PY - 2010/1/13/entrez PY - 2010/1/13/pubmed PY - 2010/10/28/medline SP - 733 EP - 41 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 34 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The majority of the studies have focused on the effect of general and central fat on coronary risk, neglecting the potential role of peripheral body fat. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of surrogate measures for general, central and peripheral body fat on the occurrence of non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (AMI). METHODS: Population-based case-control study; cases were patients aged >or=40 years consecutively hospitalized with an incident AMI (n=653), and controls were community participants without previous AMI, selected randomly from the hospitals' catchment area population (n=1713). Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference and a skinfolds composite index to estimate the proportion of peripheral subcutaneous fat in the arms were ascertained. Associations were summarized with odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), obtained from unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for the main confounders. RESULTS: WC, and in particular waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), had strong direct associations with AMI risk. Peripheral subcutaneous fat was inversely associated with AMI in women, but directly in men. Using principal component analysis, three uncorrelated factors were identified representing different patterns of fat distribution: (1) generalized fat, with high BMI and high WC; (2) central fat, with high WC and WHR; and (3) peripheral subcutaneous fat. The first factor showed no significant association with AMI, but the second factor increased AMI risk in each sex (upper vs lower fourth: OR 12.2, 95% CI 5.34-27.9 in women; OR 25.0, 95% CI 14.0-44.7 in men). In contrast, the third factor was inversely associated with AMI in women (upper vs lower fourth: OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.36-0.96) and directly associated in men (OR 2.45, 95% CI 1.69-3.55; P-value for sex interaction<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Central fat was associated with increased risk of AMI in women and men, while the peripheral subcutaneous fat index predicted a lower risk of AMI in women and a higher risk in men. SN - 1476-5497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20065979/Indices_of_central_and_peripheral_body_fat:_association_with_non_fatal_acute_myocardial_infarction_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2009.281 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -