Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Establishment of population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease in Bangalore, India.
Indian J Med Sci. 2009 Nov; 63(11):498-507.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is vaccine-preventable but few data on the incidence of PD exist for Indian children.

AIMS

To assess the feasibility of implementing prospective, population-based surveillance for PD among children less than five years of age. Settings and Design :Hospitals and health agencies, Bangalore, India. Retrospective review and analysis of hospitalization records as well as public health and demographic data.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Records for 2006 hospitalizations for pneumococcal disease-associated syndromes (meningitis, pneumonia and sepsis) were identified at three pediatric referral hospitals (Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Kempegowda Institute of Child Health and Vani Vilas Hospital) in Bangalore using International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision codes. Hospital microbiology laboratory records were assessed to ensure capacity for identifying S. pneumoniae. Population data were identified from national census and polio surveillance data.

RESULTS

The Bangalore city southern zone includes 33 wards occupying 51 Km 2 with 150,945 children between 0-5 years of age served by three referral pediatric hospitals. From January--December 2006, records of these three hospitals showed 2,219 hospitalizations of children less than five years of age (967 pneumonia, 768 sepsis, and 484 meningitis) with PD-associated diagnoses (southern zone area incidence: 0.15/100,000 PD-associated hospitalizations, less than five years of age). There were 178 deaths in children less than five years of age, of which 87 were attributable to sepsis, 56 to pneumonia and 35 to meningitis.

CONCLUSION

Our analysis suggests that the PD-associated disease burden in Bangalore is high and local institutions have capacity for population-based surveillance. In a prospective study, systematic attention to potential barriers in identifying children with pneumococcal infections will improve estimation of IPD incidence in India.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Translational Research, International Vaccine Institute, Seoul, South Korea. rajuladi@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20075551

Citation

Shah, Aparna S., et al. "Establishment of Population-based Surveillance for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Bangalore, India." Indian Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 63, no. 11, 2009, pp. 498-507.
Shah AS, Nisarga R, Ravi Kumar KL, et al. Establishment of population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease in Bangalore, India. Indian J Med Sci. 2009;63(11):498-507.
Shah, A. S., Nisarga, R., Ravi Kumar, K. L., Hubler, R., Herrera, G., & Kilgore, P. E. (2009). Establishment of population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease in Bangalore, India. Indian Journal of Medical Sciences, 63(11), 498-507. https://doi.org/10.4103/0019-5359.58879
Shah AS, et al. Establishment of Population-based Surveillance for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Bangalore, India. Indian J Med Sci. 2009;63(11):498-507. PubMed PMID: 20075551.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Establishment of population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease in Bangalore, India. AU - Shah,Aparna S, AU - Nisarga,Ramnilinga, AU - Ravi Kumar,K L, AU - Hubler,Robin, AU - Herrera,Guillermo, AU - Kilgore,Paul E, PY - 2010/1/16/entrez PY - 2010/1/16/pubmed PY - 2011/6/3/medline SP - 498 EP - 507 JF - Indian journal of medical sciences JO - Indian J Med Sci VL - 63 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is vaccine-preventable but few data on the incidence of PD exist for Indian children. AIMS: To assess the feasibility of implementing prospective, population-based surveillance for PD among children less than five years of age. Settings and Design :Hospitals and health agencies, Bangalore, India. Retrospective review and analysis of hospitalization records as well as public health and demographic data. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Records for 2006 hospitalizations for pneumococcal disease-associated syndromes (meningitis, pneumonia and sepsis) were identified at three pediatric referral hospitals (Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Kempegowda Institute of Child Health and Vani Vilas Hospital) in Bangalore using International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision codes. Hospital microbiology laboratory records were assessed to ensure capacity for identifying S. pneumoniae. Population data were identified from national census and polio surveillance data. RESULTS: The Bangalore city southern zone includes 33 wards occupying 51 Km 2 with 150,945 children between 0-5 years of age served by three referral pediatric hospitals. From January--December 2006, records of these three hospitals showed 2,219 hospitalizations of children less than five years of age (967 pneumonia, 768 sepsis, and 484 meningitis) with PD-associated diagnoses (southern zone area incidence: 0.15/100,000 PD-associated hospitalizations, less than five years of age). There were 178 deaths in children less than five years of age, of which 87 were attributable to sepsis, 56 to pneumonia and 35 to meningitis. CONCLUSION: Our analysis suggests that the PD-associated disease burden in Bangalore is high and local institutions have capacity for population-based surveillance. In a prospective study, systematic attention to potential barriers in identifying children with pneumococcal infections will improve estimation of IPD incidence in India. SN - 1998-3654 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20075551/Establishment_of_population_based_surveillance_for_invasive_pneumococcal_disease_in_Bangalore_India_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/sepsis.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -