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Patient tolerance of the flexible CO2 laser for office-based laryngeal surgery.
J Voice. 2010 Nov; 24(6):750-4.JV

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The OmniGuide flexible carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser can be readily used in the office but patient tolerance has not been established. The aim of this pilot study was to determine patient tolerance of the flexible CO(2) laser. As a reference point, the 585-nm pulsed-dye laser (PDL) was selected for comparison because it is the only office-based laser in which patient tolerance has specifically been studied.

METHODS

Prospective pilot study involving office-based surgery candidates with benign laryngeal pathology. Via flexible laryngoscopy, half of each lesion was treated with the CO(2) laser and the remaining half with the PDL, alternating the order of the lasers (to account for potential thermal injury from the first laser) and blinding the patient to treatment. Patients rated their discomfort immediately after each laser treatment and then completed postoperative questionnaires for discomfort and voice quality.

RESULTS

Ten patients with benign laryngeal disease were included. All patients tolerated the office-based laser surgeries without difficulty. The CO(2) laser was extremely well tolerated, with mean pain and burning scores of 2.0 and 2.3, respectively, on a scale of 1-10 (10 being intolerable pain). Postoperative pain questionnaires demonstrated minimal discomfort after the laser treatment. Those with resolution of laryngeal disease had significant voice improvement.

CONCLUSION

Flexible CO(2) laser laryngeal surgery is well tolerated in an office-based setting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. shalum@iupui.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20083374

Citation

Halum, Stacey L., and Aaron C. Moberly. "Patient Tolerance of the Flexible CO2 Laser for Office-based Laryngeal Surgery." Journal of Voice : Official Journal of the Voice Foundation, vol. 24, no. 6, 2010, pp. 750-4.
Halum SL, Moberly AC. Patient tolerance of the flexible CO2 laser for office-based laryngeal surgery. J Voice. 2010;24(6):750-4.
Halum, S. L., & Moberly, A. C. (2010). Patient tolerance of the flexible CO2 laser for office-based laryngeal surgery. Journal of Voice : Official Journal of the Voice Foundation, 24(6), 750-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2009.04.005
Halum SL, Moberly AC. Patient Tolerance of the Flexible CO2 Laser for Office-based Laryngeal Surgery. J Voice. 2010;24(6):750-4. PubMed PMID: 20083374.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patient tolerance of the flexible CO2 laser for office-based laryngeal surgery. AU - Halum,Stacey L, AU - Moberly,Aaron C, Y1 - 2010/01/18/ PY - 2008/11/11/received PY - 2009/04/23/accepted PY - 2010/1/20/entrez PY - 2010/1/20/pubmed PY - 2011/3/5/medline SP - 750 EP - 4 JF - Journal of voice : official journal of the Voice Foundation JO - J Voice VL - 24 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The OmniGuide flexible carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser can be readily used in the office but patient tolerance has not been established. The aim of this pilot study was to determine patient tolerance of the flexible CO(2) laser. As a reference point, the 585-nm pulsed-dye laser (PDL) was selected for comparison because it is the only office-based laser in which patient tolerance has specifically been studied. METHODS: Prospective pilot study involving office-based surgery candidates with benign laryngeal pathology. Via flexible laryngoscopy, half of each lesion was treated with the CO(2) laser and the remaining half with the PDL, alternating the order of the lasers (to account for potential thermal injury from the first laser) and blinding the patient to treatment. Patients rated their discomfort immediately after each laser treatment and then completed postoperative questionnaires for discomfort and voice quality. RESULTS: Ten patients with benign laryngeal disease were included. All patients tolerated the office-based laser surgeries without difficulty. The CO(2) laser was extremely well tolerated, with mean pain and burning scores of 2.0 and 2.3, respectively, on a scale of 1-10 (10 being intolerable pain). Postoperative pain questionnaires demonstrated minimal discomfort after the laser treatment. Those with resolution of laryngeal disease had significant voice improvement. CONCLUSION: Flexible CO(2) laser laryngeal surgery is well tolerated in an office-based setting. SN - 1873-4588 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20083374/Patient_tolerance_of_the_flexible_CO2_laser_for_office_based_laryngeal_surgery_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0892-1997(09)00062-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -