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Associations of very high intakes of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids with biomarkers of chronic disease risk among Yup'ik Eskimos.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar; 91(3):777-85.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few studies have examined the associations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with biomarkers of chronic disease risk in populations with high intakes.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the associations of red blood cell (RBC) EPA and DHA, as percentages of total fatty acids, with biomarkers of chronic disease risk across a wide range of EPA and DHA intakes.

DESIGN

In a cross-sectional study of 357 Yup'ik Eskimos, generalized additive models were used to plot covariate-adjusted associations of EPA and DHA with chronic disease biomarkers. Linear regression models were used to test for the statistical significance of these associations.

RESULTS

Means (5th-95th percentiles) for RBC EPA and DHA were 2.8% (0.5-5.9%) and 6.8% (3.3-9.0%), respectively. Associations of EPA and DHA were inverse and linear for triglycerides (beta +/- SE = -0.10 +/- 0.01 and -0.05 +/- 0.01, respectively) and positive and linear for HDL cholesterol (beta +/- SE = 2.0 +/- 0.5 and 0.9 +/- 0.6, respectively) and apolipoprotein A-I (beta +/- SE = 2.6 +/- 0.8 and 1.7 +/- 0.8, respectively). Positive linear associations of DHA with LDL and total cholesterol (beta +/- SE = 7.5 +/- 1.4 and 6.80 +/- 1.57, respectively) were observed; for EPA, these associations were nonlinear and restricted to concentrations approximately <5% of total fatty acids. Associations of EPA and DHA with C-reactive protein were inverse and nonlinear: for EPA, the association appeared stronger at concentrations approximately >3% of total fatty acids; for DHA, it was observed only at concentrations approximately >7% of total fatty acids.

CONCLUSION

Increasing EPA and DHA intakes to amounts well above those consumed by the general US population may have strong beneficial effects on chronic disease risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA. zmakhoul@fhcrc.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20089728

Citation

Makhoul, Zeina, et al. "Associations of Very High Intakes of Eicosapentaenoic and Docosahexaenoic Acids With Biomarkers of Chronic Disease Risk Among Yup'ik Eskimos." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 91, no. 3, 2010, pp. 777-85.
Makhoul Z, Kristal AR, Gulati R, et al. Associations of very high intakes of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids with biomarkers of chronic disease risk among Yup'ik Eskimos. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;91(3):777-85.
Makhoul, Z., Kristal, A. R., Gulati, R., Luick, B., Bersamin, A., Boyer, B., & Mohatt, G. V. (2010). Associations of very high intakes of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids with biomarkers of chronic disease risk among Yup'ik Eskimos. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 91(3), 777-85. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.28820
Makhoul Z, et al. Associations of Very High Intakes of Eicosapentaenoic and Docosahexaenoic Acids With Biomarkers of Chronic Disease Risk Among Yup'ik Eskimos. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;91(3):777-85. PubMed PMID: 20089728.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of very high intakes of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids with biomarkers of chronic disease risk among Yup'ik Eskimos. AU - Makhoul,Zeina, AU - Kristal,Alan R, AU - Gulati,Roman, AU - Luick,Bret, AU - Bersamin,Andrea, AU - Boyer,Bert, AU - Mohatt,Gerald V, Y1 - 2010/01/20/ PY - 2010/1/22/entrez PY - 2010/1/22/pubmed PY - 2010/3/31/medline SP - 777 EP - 85 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 91 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the associations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with biomarkers of chronic disease risk in populations with high intakes. OBJECTIVE: We examined the associations of red blood cell (RBC) EPA and DHA, as percentages of total fatty acids, with biomarkers of chronic disease risk across a wide range of EPA and DHA intakes. DESIGN: In a cross-sectional study of 357 Yup'ik Eskimos, generalized additive models were used to plot covariate-adjusted associations of EPA and DHA with chronic disease biomarkers. Linear regression models were used to test for the statistical significance of these associations. RESULTS: Means (5th-95th percentiles) for RBC EPA and DHA were 2.8% (0.5-5.9%) and 6.8% (3.3-9.0%), respectively. Associations of EPA and DHA were inverse and linear for triglycerides (beta +/- SE = -0.10 +/- 0.01 and -0.05 +/- 0.01, respectively) and positive and linear for HDL cholesterol (beta +/- SE = 2.0 +/- 0.5 and 0.9 +/- 0.6, respectively) and apolipoprotein A-I (beta +/- SE = 2.6 +/- 0.8 and 1.7 +/- 0.8, respectively). Positive linear associations of DHA with LDL and total cholesterol (beta +/- SE = 7.5 +/- 1.4 and 6.80 +/- 1.57, respectively) were observed; for EPA, these associations were nonlinear and restricted to concentrations approximately <5% of total fatty acids. Associations of EPA and DHA with C-reactive protein were inverse and nonlinear: for EPA, the association appeared stronger at concentrations approximately >3% of total fatty acids; for DHA, it was observed only at concentrations approximately >7% of total fatty acids. CONCLUSION: Increasing EPA and DHA intakes to amounts well above those consumed by the general US population may have strong beneficial effects on chronic disease risk. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20089728/Associations_of_very_high_intakes_of_eicosapentaenoic_and_docosahexaenoic_acids_with_biomarkers_of_chronic_disease_risk_among_Yup'ik_Eskimos_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2009.28820 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -