Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Comparison of the associations of body mass index and measures of central adiposity and fat mass with coronary heart disease, diabetes, and all-cause mortality: a study using data from 4 UK cohorts.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Measures of regional adiposity have been proposed as alternatives to the measurement of body mass index (BMI) for identifying persons at risk of future disease.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to compare the magnitudes of association of BMI and alternative measurements of adiposity with coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease risk factors and all-cause mortality.

DESIGN

Data from 4 cohorts of adults [3937 women from the British Women's Heart and Health Study (BWHHS); 2367 and 1950 men from phases 1 and 3, respectively, of the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS); 403 men and women from the Boyd Orr Study; and 789 men and women from the Maidstone-Dewsbury Study] were analyzed.

RESULTS

The magnitudes of associations of BMI with incident coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease risk factors were similar to those with measurements of central adiposity [waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio (WHR), or waist-height ratio (WHtR)] and more direct measurements of fat mass (bioimpedance/skinfold thickness). In CaPS (men only), there was no strong evidence of differences in the strengths of association with incident diabetes between BMI, WC, WHR, and WHtR (P for heterogeneity > 0.49 for all). In the BWHHS (women only), there was statistical evidence that WC [hazard ratio (HR): 2.35; 95% CI: 2.03, 2.73] and WHtR (HR: 2.29; 95% CI: 1.98, 2.66) were more strongly associated with diabetes than with BMI (HR: 1.80; 95% CI: 1.59, 2.04) (P for heterogeneity < 0.02 for both). Central adiposity measurements were positively associated with all-cause mortality, as was BMI, but only when those with a BMI (in kg/m(2)) <22.5 were removed from the analyses.

CONCLUSION

No strong evidence supports replacing BMI in clinical or public health practice with other adiposity measures.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adipose Tissue
    Adiposity
    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Body Height
    Body Mass Index
    Cause of Death
    Coronary Disease
    Diabetes Mellitus
    Electric Impedance
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Obesity, Abdominal
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Sex Factors
    Skinfold Thickness
    United Kingdom
    Waist Circumference
    Waist-Hip Ratio

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20089729

    Citation

    Taylor, Amy E., et al. "Comparison of the Associations of Body Mass Index and Measures of Central Adiposity and Fat Mass With Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and All-cause Mortality: a Study Using Data From 4 UK Cohorts." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 91, no. 3, 2010, pp. 547-56.
    Taylor AE, Ebrahim S, Ben-Shlomo Y, et al. Comparison of the associations of body mass index and measures of central adiposity and fat mass with coronary heart disease, diabetes, and all-cause mortality: a study using data from 4 UK cohorts. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;91(3):547-56.
    Taylor, A. E., Ebrahim, S., Ben-Shlomo, Y., Martin, R. M., Whincup, P. H., Yarnell, J. W., ... Lawlor, D. A. (2010). Comparison of the associations of body mass index and measures of central adiposity and fat mass with coronary heart disease, diabetes, and all-cause mortality: a study using data from 4 UK cohorts. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 91(3), pp. 547-56. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.28757.
    Taylor AE, et al. Comparison of the Associations of Body Mass Index and Measures of Central Adiposity and Fat Mass With Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and All-cause Mortality: a Study Using Data From 4 UK Cohorts. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;91(3):547-56. PubMed PMID: 20089729.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of the associations of body mass index and measures of central adiposity and fat mass with coronary heart disease, diabetes, and all-cause mortality: a study using data from 4 UK cohorts. AU - Taylor,Amy E, AU - Ebrahim,Shah, AU - Ben-Shlomo,Yoav, AU - Martin,Richard M, AU - Whincup,Peter H, AU - Yarnell,John W, AU - Wannamethee,S Goya, AU - Lawlor,Debbie A, Y1 - 2010/01/20/ PY - 2010/1/22/entrez PY - 2010/1/22/pubmed PY - 2010/3/31/medline SP - 547 EP - 56 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 91 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Measures of regional adiposity have been proposed as alternatives to the measurement of body mass index (BMI) for identifying persons at risk of future disease. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to compare the magnitudes of association of BMI and alternative measurements of adiposity with coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease risk factors and all-cause mortality. DESIGN: Data from 4 cohorts of adults [3937 women from the British Women's Heart and Health Study (BWHHS); 2367 and 1950 men from phases 1 and 3, respectively, of the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS); 403 men and women from the Boyd Orr Study; and 789 men and women from the Maidstone-Dewsbury Study] were analyzed. RESULTS: The magnitudes of associations of BMI with incident coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease risk factors were similar to those with measurements of central adiposity [waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio (WHR), or waist-height ratio (WHtR)] and more direct measurements of fat mass (bioimpedance/skinfold thickness). In CaPS (men only), there was no strong evidence of differences in the strengths of association with incident diabetes between BMI, WC, WHR, and WHtR (P for heterogeneity > 0.49 for all). In the BWHHS (women only), there was statistical evidence that WC [hazard ratio (HR): 2.35; 95% CI: 2.03, 2.73] and WHtR (HR: 2.29; 95% CI: 1.98, 2.66) were more strongly associated with diabetes than with BMI (HR: 1.80; 95% CI: 1.59, 2.04) (P for heterogeneity < 0.02 for both). Central adiposity measurements were positively associated with all-cause mortality, as was BMI, but only when those with a BMI (in kg/m(2)) <22.5 were removed from the analyses. CONCLUSION: No strong evidence supports replacing BMI in clinical or public health practice with other adiposity measures. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20089729/Comparison_of_the_associations_of_body_mass_index_and_measures_of_central_adiposity_and_fat_mass_with_coronary_heart_disease_diabetes_and_all_cause_mortality:_a_study_using_data_from_4_UK_cohorts_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2009.28757 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -