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Clinical outcomes after microfracture of the glenohumeral joint.
Am J Sports Med. 2010 Apr; 38(4):772-81.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Microfracture is an effective surgical treatment for isolated, full-thickness cartilage defects with current data focused on applications in the knee. No studies describing clinical outcomes of patients who have undergone microfracture in the shoulder joint have been reported.

HYPOTHESIS

Treatment of glenohumeral joint articular defects using microfracture would demonstrate similar short-term clinical outcomes when compared with other joints.

STUDY DESIGN

Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

METHODS

From March 2001 to August 2007, 16 patients (17 shoulders) who underwent arthroscopic microfracture of the humeral head and/or glenoid surface were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were examined by an independent, blinded examiner and completed surveys containing the Simple Shoulder Test (SST), American Shoulder and Elbow Score (ASES), and visual analog scale (VAS).

RESULTS

Two patients were lost to follow-up, for a follow-up rate of 88%. Three patients went on to subsequent shoulder surgery and were considered to have failed results. The mean age was 37.0 years (range, 18-55 years) with an average follow-up of 27.8 months (range, 12.1-89.2 months). The average size of humeral and glenoid defects was 5.07 cm(2) (range, 1.0-7.84 cm(2)) and 1.66 cm(2) (range, 0.4-3.75 cm(2)), respectively. There was a statistically significant decrease from 5.6 +/- 1.7 to 1.9 +/- 1.4 (P < .01) in VAS after surgery as well as statistically significant improvements (P < .01) in SST (5.7 +/- 2.1 to 10.3 +/- 1.3) and ASES (44.3 +/- 15.3 to 86.3 +/- 10.5). Twelve (92.3%) patients claimed they would have the procedure again.

CONCLUSION

Microfracture of the glenohumeral joint provides a significant improvement in pain relief and shoulder function in patients with isolated, full-thickness chondral injuries. Longer term studies are required to determine if similar results are maintained over time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20093422

Citation

Frank, Rachel M., et al. "Clinical Outcomes After Microfracture of the Glenohumeral Joint." The American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 38, no. 4, 2010, pp. 772-81.
Frank RM, Van Thiel GS, Slabaugh MA, et al. Clinical outcomes after microfracture of the glenohumeral joint. Am J Sports Med. 2010;38(4):772-81.
Frank, R. M., Van Thiel, G. S., Slabaugh, M. A., Romeo, A. A., Cole, B. J., & Verma, N. N. (2010). Clinical outcomes after microfracture of the glenohumeral joint. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 38(4), 772-81. https://doi.org/10.1177/0363546509350304
Frank RM, et al. Clinical Outcomes After Microfracture of the Glenohumeral Joint. Am J Sports Med. 2010;38(4):772-81. PubMed PMID: 20093422.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical outcomes after microfracture of the glenohumeral joint. AU - Frank,Rachel M, AU - Van Thiel,Geoffrey S, AU - Slabaugh,Mark A, AU - Romeo,Anthony A, AU - Cole,Brian J, AU - Verma,Nikhil N, Y1 - 2010/01/21/ PY - 2010/1/23/entrez PY - 2010/1/23/pubmed PY - 2010/7/17/medline SP - 772 EP - 81 JF - The American journal of sports medicine JO - Am J Sports Med VL - 38 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Microfracture is an effective surgical treatment for isolated, full-thickness cartilage defects with current data focused on applications in the knee. No studies describing clinical outcomes of patients who have undergone microfracture in the shoulder joint have been reported. HYPOTHESIS: Treatment of glenohumeral joint articular defects using microfracture would demonstrate similar short-term clinical outcomes when compared with other joints. STUDY DESIGN: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. METHODS: From March 2001 to August 2007, 16 patients (17 shoulders) who underwent arthroscopic microfracture of the humeral head and/or glenoid surface were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were examined by an independent, blinded examiner and completed surveys containing the Simple Shoulder Test (SST), American Shoulder and Elbow Score (ASES), and visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: Two patients were lost to follow-up, for a follow-up rate of 88%. Three patients went on to subsequent shoulder surgery and were considered to have failed results. The mean age was 37.0 years (range, 18-55 years) with an average follow-up of 27.8 months (range, 12.1-89.2 months). The average size of humeral and glenoid defects was 5.07 cm(2) (range, 1.0-7.84 cm(2)) and 1.66 cm(2) (range, 0.4-3.75 cm(2)), respectively. There was a statistically significant decrease from 5.6 +/- 1.7 to 1.9 +/- 1.4 (P < .01) in VAS after surgery as well as statistically significant improvements (P < .01) in SST (5.7 +/- 2.1 to 10.3 +/- 1.3) and ASES (44.3 +/- 15.3 to 86.3 +/- 10.5). Twelve (92.3%) patients claimed they would have the procedure again. CONCLUSION: Microfracture of the glenohumeral joint provides a significant improvement in pain relief and shoulder function in patients with isolated, full-thickness chondral injuries. Longer term studies are required to determine if similar results are maintained over time. SN - 1552-3365 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20093422/Clinical_outcomes_after_microfracture_of_the_glenohumeral_joint_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0363546509350304?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -