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Pediatric pedestrian injuries and associated hospital resource utilization in the United States, 2003.
J Trauma. 2010 Jun; 68(6):1406-12.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The objective was to calculate national estimates of pedestrian-related hospitalizations and associated use of healthcare resources among children <or=19 years of age and to explore the effects of sociodemographic, hospital-related factors, and injury severity on total charges and lengths of stay (LOS) in the United States.

METHODS

Data from the 2003 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database were used. The sample included patients <or=19 years hospitalized with pedestrian-related injuries, from 3,438 hospitals in 36 states. National estimates of pedestrian-associated hospitalizations, rates, resource use, injury severity, and demographics were calculated. Potentially significant covariate associations were studied using hospital charges and LOS.

RESULTS

In 2003, 9,172 pedestrian-associated hospitalizations occurred among children <or=19 years in the United States, resulting in USD 290.8 million (standard deviation [SD] = USD 23.6 million) in inpatient charges and 44,895 (SD = 2,964) days of hospitalization. Mean (SD) hospital charges and LOS were $32,059 ($74,778) days and 4.9 (10.9) days, respectively. Thirty-six percent of patients suffered a traumatic brain injury, and 21% sustained severe injury with an injury severity scale score >or=16. A traffic-related event was the cause of 92.7% of hospitalizations. Older age, higher injury severity, urban and Western hospital location, children's hospital type, and longer LOS were significantly associated with higher total hospital charges. Older age and higher injury severity were significantly associated with longer LOS.

CONCLUSION

Pediatric pedestrian injuries contribute substantially to the healthcare resource burden in the United States, accounting for approximately 45,000 days of hospitalization and >USD 290 million in inpatient charges annually.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, OH 43205, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20093987

Citation

Conner, Kristen A., et al. "Pediatric Pedestrian Injuries and Associated Hospital Resource Utilization in the United States, 2003." The Journal of Trauma, vol. 68, no. 6, 2010, pp. 1406-12.
Conner KA, Williams LE, McKenzie LB, et al. Pediatric pedestrian injuries and associated hospital resource utilization in the United States, 2003. J Trauma. 2010;68(6):1406-12.
Conner, K. A., Williams, L. E., McKenzie, L. B., Shields, B. J., Fernandez, S. A., & Smith, G. A. (2010). Pediatric pedestrian injuries and associated hospital resource utilization in the United States, 2003. The Journal of Trauma, 68(6), 1406-12. https://doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e3181b28b05
Conner KA, et al. Pediatric Pedestrian Injuries and Associated Hospital Resource Utilization in the United States, 2003. J Trauma. 2010;68(6):1406-12. PubMed PMID: 20093987.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pediatric pedestrian injuries and associated hospital resource utilization in the United States, 2003. AU - Conner,Kristen A, AU - Williams,Lindsay E, AU - McKenzie,Lara B, AU - Shields,Brenda J, AU - Fernandez,Soledad A, AU - Smith,Gary A, PY - 2010/1/23/entrez PY - 2010/1/23/pubmed PY - 2010/7/16/medline SP - 1406 EP - 12 JF - The Journal of trauma JO - J Trauma VL - 68 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The objective was to calculate national estimates of pedestrian-related hospitalizations and associated use of healthcare resources among children <or=19 years of age and to explore the effects of sociodemographic, hospital-related factors, and injury severity on total charges and lengths of stay (LOS) in the United States. METHODS: Data from the 2003 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database were used. The sample included patients <or=19 years hospitalized with pedestrian-related injuries, from 3,438 hospitals in 36 states. National estimates of pedestrian-associated hospitalizations, rates, resource use, injury severity, and demographics were calculated. Potentially significant covariate associations were studied using hospital charges and LOS. RESULTS: In 2003, 9,172 pedestrian-associated hospitalizations occurred among children <or=19 years in the United States, resulting in USD 290.8 million (standard deviation [SD] = USD 23.6 million) in inpatient charges and 44,895 (SD = 2,964) days of hospitalization. Mean (SD) hospital charges and LOS were $32,059 ($74,778) days and 4.9 (10.9) days, respectively. Thirty-six percent of patients suffered a traumatic brain injury, and 21% sustained severe injury with an injury severity scale score >or=16. A traffic-related event was the cause of 92.7% of hospitalizations. Older age, higher injury severity, urban and Western hospital location, children's hospital type, and longer LOS were significantly associated with higher total hospital charges. Older age and higher injury severity were significantly associated with longer LOS. CONCLUSION: Pediatric pedestrian injuries contribute substantially to the healthcare resource burden in the United States, accounting for approximately 45,000 days of hospitalization and >USD 290 million in inpatient charges annually. SN - 1529-8809 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20093987/Pediatric_pedestrian_injuries_and_associated_hospital_resource_utilization_in_the_United_States_2003_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e3181b28b05 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -