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Transfusion-related transmission of yellow fever vaccine virus--California, 2009.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Jan 22; 59(2):34-7.MM

Abstract

In the United States, yellow fever (YF) vaccination is recommended for travelers and active duty military members visiting endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa and Central/South America. The American Red Cross recommends that recipients of YF vaccine defer blood product donation for 2 weeks because of the theoretical risk for transmission from a viremic donor. On April 10, 2009, a hospital blood bank supervisor learned that, on March 27, blood products had been collected from 89 U.S. active duty trainees who had received YF vaccine 4 days before donation. This report summarizes the subsequent investigation by the hospital and CDC to identify lapses in donor deferral and to determine whether transfusion-related transmission of YF vaccine virus occurred. The investigation found that a recent change in the timing of trainee vaccination had occurred and that vaccinees had not reported recent YF vaccination status at time of donation. Despite a prompt recall, six units of blood products were transfused into five patients. No clinical evidence or laboratory abnormalities consistent with a serious adverse reaction were identified in four recipients within the first month after transfusion; the fifth patient, who had prostate cancer and end-stage, transfusion-dependent, B-cell lymphoma, died while in hospice care. Three of the four surviving patients had evidence of serologic response to YF vaccine virus. This report provides evidence that transfusion-related transmission of YF vaccine virus can occur and underscores the need for careful screening and deferral of recently vaccinated blood donors.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20094025

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Transfusion-related Transmission of Yellow Fever Vaccine virus--California, 2009." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. 2, 2010, pp. 34-7.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Transfusion-related transmission of yellow fever vaccine virus--California, 2009. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010;59(2):34-7.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2010). Transfusion-related transmission of yellow fever vaccine virus--California, 2009. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 59(2), 34-7.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Transfusion-related Transmission of Yellow Fever Vaccine virus--California, 2009. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Jan 22;59(2):34-7. PubMed PMID: 20094025.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transfusion-related transmission of yellow fever vaccine virus--California, 2009. A1 - ,, PY - 2010/1/23/entrez PY - 2010/1/23/pubmed PY - 2010/1/26/medline SP - 34 EP - 7 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 59 IS - 2 N2 - In the United States, yellow fever (YF) vaccination is recommended for travelers and active duty military members visiting endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa and Central/South America. The American Red Cross recommends that recipients of YF vaccine defer blood product donation for 2 weeks because of the theoretical risk for transmission from a viremic donor. On April 10, 2009, a hospital blood bank supervisor learned that, on March 27, blood products had been collected from 89 U.S. active duty trainees who had received YF vaccine 4 days before donation. This report summarizes the subsequent investigation by the hospital and CDC to identify lapses in donor deferral and to determine whether transfusion-related transmission of YF vaccine virus occurred. The investigation found that a recent change in the timing of trainee vaccination had occurred and that vaccinees had not reported recent YF vaccination status at time of donation. Despite a prompt recall, six units of blood products were transfused into five patients. No clinical evidence or laboratory abnormalities consistent with a serious adverse reaction were identified in four recipients within the first month after transfusion; the fifth patient, who had prostate cancer and end-stage, transfusion-dependent, B-cell lymphoma, died while in hospice care. Three of the four surviving patients had evidence of serologic response to YF vaccine virus. This report provides evidence that transfusion-related transmission of YF vaccine virus can occur and underscores the need for careful screening and deferral of recently vaccinated blood donors. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20094025/Transfusion_related_transmission_of_yellow_fever_vaccine_virus__California_2009_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5902a2.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -