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Intakes of vitamin A, C, and E, and beta-carotene are associated with risk of cervical cancer: a case-control study in Korea.
Nutr Cancer 2010; 62(2):181-9NC

Abstract

Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Korea, although the incidence has been declining in recent years. This study explored whether antioxidant vitamin intakes influenced the risk of cervical cancer. The association between antioxidant vitamin intakes and cervical cancer risk was calculated for 144 cervical cancer cases and 288 age-matched, hospital-based controls using unconditional logistic regression models. Cases reported statistically lower mean dietary intakes of vitamin A, beta -carotene, and vitamin C than did controls. Total intakes of vitamins A and E, which included both dietary and supplement intake, were also lower in cases. Those patients in the highest quartiles of dietary vitamin A, beta -carotene, and vitamin C intakes had statistically significantly lower cervical cancer risks than those in the lowest quartiles for vitamin A, beta -carotene, and vitamin C: odds ratio (OR) = 0.36 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.19-0.69), OR = 0.48 (CI = 0.26-0.88), and OR = 0.36 (CI = 0.18-0.69), respectively. Total intakes of vitamins A, C, and E were strongly inversely associated with cervical cancer risk: OR = 0.35 (CI = 0.19-0.65), OR = 0.35 (CI = 0.19-0.66), and OR = 0.53 (CI = 0.28-0.99), respectively. The findings support a role for increased antioxidant vitamin intake in decreasing the risk of cervical cancer. These associations need to be assessed in large prospective studies with long-term follow-up.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Cancer Center, Kyunggido 411-769, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20099192

Citation

Kim, Jeongseon, et al. "Intakes of Vitamin A, C, and E, and Beta-carotene Are Associated With Risk of Cervical Cancer: a Case-control Study in Korea." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 62, no. 2, 2010, pp. 181-9.
Kim J, Kim MK, Lee JK, et al. Intakes of vitamin A, C, and E, and beta-carotene are associated with risk of cervical cancer: a case-control study in Korea. Nutr Cancer. 2010;62(2):181-9.
Kim, J., Kim, M. K., Lee, J. K., Kim, J. H., Son, S. K., Song, E. S., ... Yun, Y. M. (2010). Intakes of vitamin A, C, and E, and beta-carotene are associated with risk of cervical cancer: a case-control study in Korea. Nutrition and Cancer, 62(2), pp. 181-9. doi:10.1080/01635580903305326.
Kim J, et al. Intakes of Vitamin A, C, and E, and Beta-carotene Are Associated With Risk of Cervical Cancer: a Case-control Study in Korea. Nutr Cancer. 2010;62(2):181-9. PubMed PMID: 20099192.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intakes of vitamin A, C, and E, and beta-carotene are associated with risk of cervical cancer: a case-control study in Korea. AU - Kim,Jeongseon, AU - Kim,Mi Kyung, AU - Lee,Jae Kwan, AU - Kim,Jae-Hoon, AU - Son,Sung Kyong, AU - Song,Eun-Seop, AU - Lee,Kwang Beom, AU - Lee,Jung Pil, AU - Lee,Jong Min, AU - Yun,Young Mi, PY - 2010/1/26/entrez PY - 2010/1/26/pubmed PY - 2010/3/26/medline SP - 181 EP - 9 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 62 IS - 2 N2 - Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Korea, although the incidence has been declining in recent years. This study explored whether antioxidant vitamin intakes influenced the risk of cervical cancer. The association between antioxidant vitamin intakes and cervical cancer risk was calculated for 144 cervical cancer cases and 288 age-matched, hospital-based controls using unconditional logistic regression models. Cases reported statistically lower mean dietary intakes of vitamin A, beta -carotene, and vitamin C than did controls. Total intakes of vitamins A and E, which included both dietary and supplement intake, were also lower in cases. Those patients in the highest quartiles of dietary vitamin A, beta -carotene, and vitamin C intakes had statistically significantly lower cervical cancer risks than those in the lowest quartiles for vitamin A, beta -carotene, and vitamin C: odds ratio (OR) = 0.36 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.19-0.69), OR = 0.48 (CI = 0.26-0.88), and OR = 0.36 (CI = 0.18-0.69), respectively. Total intakes of vitamins A, C, and E were strongly inversely associated with cervical cancer risk: OR = 0.35 (CI = 0.19-0.65), OR = 0.35 (CI = 0.19-0.66), and OR = 0.53 (CI = 0.28-0.99), respectively. The findings support a role for increased antioxidant vitamin intake in decreasing the risk of cervical cancer. These associations need to be assessed in large prospective studies with long-term follow-up. SN - 1532-7914 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20099192/Intakes_of_vitamin_A_C_and_E_and_beta_carotene_are_associated_with_risk_of_cervical_cancer:_a_case_control_study_in_Korea_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635580903305326 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -