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Self-reported sleep disorders in secondary school students: an epidemiological and risk behavioural analysis.
J Prev Med Hyg. 2009 Jun; 50(2):102-8.JP

Abstract

PURPOSE

To estimate the prevalence of self-reported sleep disorders (SD), to examine associations among demographic characteristics and familiar factors with SD, between SD and daytime sleep-related disorders (DD) and between evening habits and SD.

METHODS

An anonymous questionnaire was proposed to 1563 students (aged 14-21 years, mean age 16.5 +/- 1.5; 42.8% males, 57.2% females) attending all classes of two high schools in Verona (North-East of Italy). Data were analyzed by some personal and familial characteristics, by definition of three sleeper groups (non problem, occasional problem or problem-sleepers). Moreover SD were put in relation with DD and with some personal evening attitudes.

RESULTS

The 75.5% of the subjects report at least one SD. Difficulty falling asleep is the most frequent SD. The DD concern 91.2% of the sample. Females are more involved than males in SD and DD. All SD result strongly associated with the referred DD, except for sleepiness. Sport is significantly correlated with a minor prevalence of SD. Smoking and studying appear to be associated with SD.

CONCLUSIONS

Since SD in youth constitute an important Public Health matter with a severe social impact they would be accurately studied to offer youth appropriate counselling given the importance of lifestyle in determining good sleep.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine and Public Health, Hygiene and Environmental Occupational Preventive Medicine Division, University of Verona, Italy. silvia.majori@univr.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20099440

Citation

Majori, S, et al. "Self-reported Sleep Disorders in Secondary School Students: an Epidemiological and Risk Behavioural Analysis." Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 50, no. 2, 2009, pp. 102-8.
Majori S, Pasqualetto C, Mantovani W, et al. Self-reported sleep disorders in secondary school students: an epidemiological and risk behavioural analysis. J Prev Med Hyg. 2009;50(2):102-8.
Majori, S., Pasqualetto, C., Mantovani, W., Baldovin, T., Veronese, S., Marcer, D., Capretta, F., Sacchi, C., & Baldo, V. (2009). Self-reported sleep disorders in secondary school students: an epidemiological and risk behavioural analysis. Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, 50(2), 102-8.
Majori S, et al. Self-reported Sleep Disorders in Secondary School Students: an Epidemiological and Risk Behavioural Analysis. J Prev Med Hyg. 2009;50(2):102-8. PubMed PMID: 20099440.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported sleep disorders in secondary school students: an epidemiological and risk behavioural analysis. AU - Majori,S, AU - Pasqualetto,C, AU - Mantovani,W, AU - Baldovin,T, AU - Veronese,S, AU - Marcer,D, AU - Capretta,F, AU - Sacchi,C, AU - Baldo,V, PY - 2010/1/27/entrez PY - 2010/1/27/pubmed PY - 2010/3/17/medline SP - 102 EP - 8 JF - Journal of preventive medicine and hygiene JO - J Prev Med Hyg VL - 50 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: To estimate the prevalence of self-reported sleep disorders (SD), to examine associations among demographic characteristics and familiar factors with SD, between SD and daytime sleep-related disorders (DD) and between evening habits and SD. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was proposed to 1563 students (aged 14-21 years, mean age 16.5 +/- 1.5; 42.8% males, 57.2% females) attending all classes of two high schools in Verona (North-East of Italy). Data were analyzed by some personal and familial characteristics, by definition of three sleeper groups (non problem, occasional problem or problem-sleepers). Moreover SD were put in relation with DD and with some personal evening attitudes. RESULTS: The 75.5% of the subjects report at least one SD. Difficulty falling asleep is the most frequent SD. The DD concern 91.2% of the sample. Females are more involved than males in SD and DD. All SD result strongly associated with the referred DD, except for sleepiness. Sport is significantly correlated with a minor prevalence of SD. Smoking and studying appear to be associated with SD. CONCLUSIONS: Since SD in youth constitute an important Public Health matter with a severe social impact they would be accurately studied to offer youth appropriate counselling given the importance of lifestyle in determining good sleep. SN - 1121-2233 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20099440/Self_reported_sleep_disorders_in_secondary_school_students:_an_epidemiological_and_risk_behavioural_analysis_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -