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Effect of incorporating legume flour into semolina spaghetti on its cooking quality and glycaemic impact measured in vitro.
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2010 Mar; 61(2):149-60.IJ

Abstract

Spaghetti is a favoured carbohydrate source because of its low glycaemic impact. The protein quality of semolina spaghetti is not ideal, however, and could be improved by including legume flour. We investigated whether incorporating legume flour in spaghetti, to improve its nutritional value, would affect its cooking quality and glycaemic impact. Four types of spaghetti containing 10% of either mung bean, soya bean, red lentil or chickpea flour were made and compared with a spaghetti control made only of durum semolina. Cooking quality was determined as the optimal cooking time (OCT), cooking loss (CL), dry matter (DM), swelling index, colour, hardness and adhesiveness. The spaghetti samples with legume flour were similar to one another and to the control in values of OCT, DM, swelling index, colour, CL, hardness and adhesiveness. Glycaemic impact of the samples was measured in vitro as release of rapidly available carbohydrate and slowly available carbohydrate during pancreatic digestion. The glycaemic index (GI) of the spaghetti samples was estimated by calculation, using data obtained for a reference food of known GI (shredded wheat horizontal line an extrusion-cooked wheat-only product). The shredded wheat underwent rapid parabolic digestion, and the near linear phase during which most of the starch was digested was completed between 20 and 60 min digestion. In contrast, the digestion of spaghetti was much slower and progressed almost linearly to completion. All spaghetti samples, moreover, were similarly susceptible to digestion, and compared with the wheat reference were all significantly lower in terms of relative glycaemic impact. We conclude that the incorporation of 10% legume flour in spaghetti to improve its nutritional value does not affect its cooking quality or increase its glycaemic impact.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Functional Food Centre, School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 OBP, UK. stefaniachillo@brookes.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20113187

Citation

Chillo, Stefania, et al. "Effect of Incorporating Legume Flour Into Semolina Spaghetti On Its Cooking Quality and Glycaemic Impact Measured in Vitro." International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, vol. 61, no. 2, 2010, pp. 149-60.
Chillo S, Monro JA, Mishra S, et al. Effect of incorporating legume flour into semolina spaghetti on its cooking quality and glycaemic impact measured in vitro. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2010;61(2):149-60.
Chillo, S., Monro, J. A., Mishra, S., & Henry, C. J. (2010). Effect of incorporating legume flour into semolina spaghetti on its cooking quality and glycaemic impact measured in vitro. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 61(2), 149-60. https://doi.org/10.3109/09637480903476423
Chillo S, et al. Effect of Incorporating Legume Flour Into Semolina Spaghetti On Its Cooking Quality and Glycaemic Impact Measured in Vitro. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2010;61(2):149-60. PubMed PMID: 20113187.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of incorporating legume flour into semolina spaghetti on its cooking quality and glycaemic impact measured in vitro. AU - Chillo,Stefania, AU - Monro,J A, AU - Mishra,S, AU - Henry,C J, PY - 2010/2/2/entrez PY - 2010/2/2/pubmed PY - 2010/6/9/medline SP - 149 EP - 60 JF - International journal of food sciences and nutrition JO - Int J Food Sci Nutr VL - 61 IS - 2 N2 - Spaghetti is a favoured carbohydrate source because of its low glycaemic impact. The protein quality of semolina spaghetti is not ideal, however, and could be improved by including legume flour. We investigated whether incorporating legume flour in spaghetti, to improve its nutritional value, would affect its cooking quality and glycaemic impact. Four types of spaghetti containing 10% of either mung bean, soya bean, red lentil or chickpea flour were made and compared with a spaghetti control made only of durum semolina. Cooking quality was determined as the optimal cooking time (OCT), cooking loss (CL), dry matter (DM), swelling index, colour, hardness and adhesiveness. The spaghetti samples with legume flour were similar to one another and to the control in values of OCT, DM, swelling index, colour, CL, hardness and adhesiveness. Glycaemic impact of the samples was measured in vitro as release of rapidly available carbohydrate and slowly available carbohydrate during pancreatic digestion. The glycaemic index (GI) of the spaghetti samples was estimated by calculation, using data obtained for a reference food of known GI (shredded wheat horizontal line an extrusion-cooked wheat-only product). The shredded wheat underwent rapid parabolic digestion, and the near linear phase during which most of the starch was digested was completed between 20 and 60 min digestion. In contrast, the digestion of spaghetti was much slower and progressed almost linearly to completion. All spaghetti samples, moreover, were similarly susceptible to digestion, and compared with the wheat reference were all significantly lower in terms of relative glycaemic impact. We conclude that the incorporation of 10% legume flour in spaghetti to improve its nutritional value does not affect its cooking quality or increase its glycaemic impact. SN - 1465-3478 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20113187/Effect_of_incorporating_legume_flour_into_semolina_spaghetti_on_its_cooking_quality_and_glycaemic_impact_measured_in_vitro_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09637480903476423 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -