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RETRACTED ARTICLE

Nursing care of families with parents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender.
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2010 Feb; 23(1):11-6.JC

Abstract

TOPIC

Families in which parents are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender are more diverse than they are similar. The numbers of parents and children in these families appear to be increasing with implications for nurses and other clinicians.

PURPOSE

This paper reviews the current literature to determine the fundamental issues facing alternate families that include sexual minority parents and their children. It also explores the unique nursing needs of families with gay, lesbian, transgender, or bisexual parents in the field, which are critically examined for direct relevance to psychiatric nursing practice.

SOURCES USED

Current theoretical and research literature in nursing, child development, family law, and healthcare professional journals.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite a relative lack of pathology noted in the literature related to families with sexual minority parents, nurses, and other healthcare professionals can incorporate current knowledge of unique child developmental, parenting, and legal issues into their work with these families. Assessments and interventions that address the unique needs of these families may help parents and children to deal with social stress from being perceived as "different" by other children, or as "problematic and threatening" by other parents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nursing Education Graduate Program, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, USA. webersjm@pitt.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Retracted Publication
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20122083

Citation

Weber, Scott. "Nursing Care of Families With Parents Who Are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender." Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing : Official Publication of the Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nurses, Inc, vol. 23, no. 1, 2010, pp. 11-6.
Weber S. Nursing care of families with parents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2010;23(1):11-6.
Weber, S. (2010). Nursing care of families with parents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing : Official Publication of the Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nurses, Inc, 23(1), 11-6. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-6171.2009.00211.x
Weber S. Nursing Care of Families With Parents Who Are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender. J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2010;23(1):11-6. PubMed PMID: 20122083.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nursing care of families with parents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. A1 - Weber,Scott, PY - 2010/2/4/entrez PY - 2010/2/4/pubmed PY - 2011/5/24/medline SP - 11 EP - 6 JF - Journal of child and adolescent psychiatric nursing : official publication of the Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nurses, Inc JO - J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs VL - 23 IS - 1 N2 - TOPIC: Families in which parents are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender are more diverse than they are similar. The numbers of parents and children in these families appear to be increasing with implications for nurses and other clinicians. PURPOSE: This paper reviews the current literature to determine the fundamental issues facing alternate families that include sexual minority parents and their children. It also explores the unique nursing needs of families with gay, lesbian, transgender, or bisexual parents in the field, which are critically examined for direct relevance to psychiatric nursing practice. SOURCES USED: Current theoretical and research literature in nursing, child development, family law, and healthcare professional journals. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a relative lack of pathology noted in the literature related to families with sexual minority parents, nurses, and other healthcare professionals can incorporate current knowledge of unique child developmental, parenting, and legal issues into their work with these families. Assessments and interventions that address the unique needs of these families may help parents and children to deal with social stress from being perceived as "different" by other children, or as "problematic and threatening" by other parents. SN - 1744-6171 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20122083/Nursing_care_of_families_with_parents_who_are_lesbian_gay_bisexual_or_transgender_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-6171.2009.00211.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -