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Folic acid supplementation in younger and older nonpregnant women of reproductive age: findings from the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS).
Womens Health Issues. 2010 Jan-Feb; 20(1):50-7.WH

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND

This study explores variables associated with daily folic acid supplementation among nonpregnant women ages 18-24, in comparison with women ages 25-45. Health-related behaviors, reproductive status, health care access, and sociodemographic variables are included.

METHODS

Data are from a cross-sectional population-based survey of 2,002 women ages 18-45 in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study. The analytic sample included 246 women ages 18-24 and 1,636 women ages 25-45 who were not pregnant at the time of survey.

RESULTS

Seventeen percent of women ages 18-24 and 27% of women ages 24-45 used daily folic acid supplements. In multiple logistic regression analysis, folic acid use was significantly associated with only two variables among younger women: fruit consumption at least daily and regular physical activity levels meeting recommended guidelines. Among older women, folic acid use was associated with these same two health-related behaviors in addition to not smoking, seeing an obstetrician-gynecologist, receiving diet/nutrition counseling, being married or living with a partner, and no prior pregnancy. Folic acid use was not associated with pregnancy intention in either age group.

CONCLUSIONS AND DISCUSSION

Women ages 18-24 have significantly lower rates of folic acid supplementation compared with older women of reproductive age, but fewer variables are associated with folic acid use among younger women. Missed opportunities to educate younger women about the benefits of folic acid supplementation are identified.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, 600 Centerview Drive, A210, Hershey, PA 17033, USA. levans@hmc.psu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20123175

Citation

Evans, Laura, and Carol S. Weisman. "Folic Acid Supplementation in Younger and Older Nonpregnant Women of Reproductive Age: Findings From the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS)." Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, vol. 20, no. 1, 2010, pp. 50-7.
Evans L, Weisman CS. Folic acid supplementation in younger and older nonpregnant women of reproductive age: findings from the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS). Womens Health Issues. 2010;20(1):50-7.
Evans, L., & Weisman, C. S. (2010). Folic acid supplementation in younger and older nonpregnant women of reproductive age: findings from the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS). Women's Health Issues : Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, 20(1), 50-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.whi.2009.10.001
Evans L, Weisman CS. Folic Acid Supplementation in Younger and Older Nonpregnant Women of Reproductive Age: Findings From the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS). Womens Health Issues. 2010;20(1):50-7. PubMed PMID: 20123175.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Folic acid supplementation in younger and older nonpregnant women of reproductive age: findings from the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study (CePAWHS). AU - Evans,Laura, AU - Weisman,Carol S, PY - 2009/04/18/received PY - 2009/09/14/revised PY - 2009/10/23/accepted PY - 2010/2/4/entrez PY - 2010/2/4/pubmed PY - 2010/4/24/medline SP - 50 EP - 7 JF - Women's health issues : official publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health JO - Womens Health Issues VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: This study explores variables associated with daily folic acid supplementation among nonpregnant women ages 18-24, in comparison with women ages 25-45. Health-related behaviors, reproductive status, health care access, and sociodemographic variables are included. METHODS: Data are from a cross-sectional population-based survey of 2,002 women ages 18-45 in the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study. The analytic sample included 246 women ages 18-24 and 1,636 women ages 25-45 who were not pregnant at the time of survey. RESULTS: Seventeen percent of women ages 18-24 and 27% of women ages 24-45 used daily folic acid supplements. In multiple logistic regression analysis, folic acid use was significantly associated with only two variables among younger women: fruit consumption at least daily and regular physical activity levels meeting recommended guidelines. Among older women, folic acid use was associated with these same two health-related behaviors in addition to not smoking, seeing an obstetrician-gynecologist, receiving diet/nutrition counseling, being married or living with a partner, and no prior pregnancy. Folic acid use was not associated with pregnancy intention in either age group. CONCLUSIONS AND DISCUSSION: Women ages 18-24 have significantly lower rates of folic acid supplementation compared with older women of reproductive age, but fewer variables are associated with folic acid use among younger women. Missed opportunities to educate younger women about the benefits of folic acid supplementation are identified. SN - 1878-4321 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20123175/Folic_acid_supplementation_in_younger_and_older_nonpregnant_women_of_reproductive_age:_findings_from_the_Central_Pennsylvania_Women's_Health_Study__CePAWHS__ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1049-3867(09)00127-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -